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Las Vegas Prop Company Hosts Whip Crackers, Trick Ropers and More at 1st Annual Wild West Arts Fest

In Entertainment, history, Media, National News, Theatre, Travel, Uncategorized, World News on April 22, 2019 at 10:00 am

Las Vegas, Nevada, April 2, 2019 – Western Stage Props, a stage and film prop supply company based in Las Vegas, Nevada, is sponsoring the 2019 Wild West Arts Fest, May 2nd through the 4th at The Orleans Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. The festival consists of three full days of classes focused on the four classic Western art forms of gun spinning and handling, knife throwing, trick roping and whip cracking. The festival will also include open practice time, skill sharing sessions, lighthearted competitions, nightly events including a dinner show, and more.

The Western Arts are the performance skills that developed in the Old West, made famous since the earliest days of Wild West shows and cinema. While training in traditional variety arts such as juggling, dance and circus are now easier to find than ever, training in the Western Arts is limited to a select few who happen to be in the right place at the right time. This is where the organizers feel this festival is incredibly important.

PRINT - WAFLOGO-icon-6inches - CopyNow under new ownership and management, Western Stage Props in Las Vegas has provided film and stage props for nearly three decades and specializes in Western Arts products such as whips, rope, throwing weapons, prop guns and trick saddles, as well as educational material. Their products have been featured in movies and theatrical productions including Indiana Jones and the world-famous Cirque Du Soleil. They are working to develop new products designed to bring the love of the Western Arts to a broader audience. Still, they have maintained the same high-quality items that make them the leader in Western performance equipment, that’s why they chose now to resurrect a long-loved tradition – the Wild West Arts Fest.

“Our event is all inclusive so anyone from an enthusiast to professional can participate and we believe having a place to meet up once a year to share and grow is vital to the Western community,” said Kyle Peterson, Western Stage Props manager. “We aim to unite the older generation and their deep history with a generation of newcomers looking to learn, grow and become a part of history. Even more important, our select teaching staff has grown out of the former Wild West Arts Conventions that originally brought so many wonderful performers together, where experts are thrilled to teach a new generation.”

The event is open to the public as either a full participant or a spectator. Discounted room rates are also available at the hotel by mentioning the event. Complete details are available by calling Western Stage Props at 702-873-1100 or online https://www.westernstageprops.com/Wild-West-Arts-Fest-s/1920.htm.

List of Teacher Performers Scheduled to Present at the 1st Annual Wild West Arts Fest

AJ Silver was born and raised in The Bronx, New York. As a child, AJ was fascinated by the cowboy tales of the Wild West. Upon seeing his first rodeo at Madison Square Garden, he found his calling: He would be a rodeo trick rider! After graduation, AJ headed for the western trail and never looked back. Since AJ has traveled across the USA performing his western variety act combining trick roping, bullwhip artistry and boleadoras. His achievements include a lifetime of stage appearances, television spots on The Today Show, Good Morning America, MTV, ESPN, CNN, and most notably, the chance to trick ride at Madison Square Garden where his riding dreams were born.

David Adamovich better known as The Great Throwdini holds over 40 world records including being the world’s fastest and most accurate knife thrower.  A man of many talents David ‘s previous endeavors include a career as a paramedic, appearing at the 1967 World’s Fair as a partner acrobat with his twin brother and becoming an ordained minister. David began his knife throwing adventures as The Great Throwdini in his 50’s. He has appeared on Ripley’s Believe It or Not, America’s Got Talent, and Late Night with Conan O’Brien. And just when you thought his story couldn’t get any more interesting, David is the only knife thrower to ever perform The Veiled Double Wheel of Death (2 assistants behind a paper veil), no small feat.

Chris McDaniel is a long-time cowboy performing and teaching trick roping as well as delighting audiences with his whip cracking skills. Chris got his start on stage as a formally trained actor and singer, wanting to stand out in the crowd; he picked up a rope and fell in love with the Wild West. Chris has graced the stage in innumerable cabaret, variety and dinner theater stage shows across the county. His TV appearances include: Late Night with David Letterman and Best Week Ever with Neil Patrick Harris, but you may know him best from his career-defining role with the Broadway tour of The Will Roger’s Follies.

Paul Nolan is one of the county’s most revered whip artisans. Paul began the art of making whips as young adolescent learning from the best in the business. He spent countless years perfecting his craft. You can see him in action on The Discovery Channel’s How It’s Made as he takes you step by step through the labor-intensive process of making one of his beautiful art pieces. Paul has been commissioned by some of Hollywood’s biggest blockbusters to make whips including The Kingsman films, The Lone Ranger, Django Unchained, and the TV series Freakshow.

Loop Rawlins is a Wild West superstar. Launched to fame by his outstanding success on America’s Got Talent Loop has made an impressive career form rodeos to the red carpet. Born and raised in Tucson, Arizona, as a youngster Loop loved adventure movies and always had a knack for entertaining.  When he saw trick roping for the first time, he was inspired to learn the technique. Nowadays Loop can do it all: he is a gunslinger, rope spinner and whip cracker. After a 3-year run with Cirque Du Soliel in Viva Elvis, Loop can be seen opening for country music stars, performing for celebrities and stunt doubling in the major motion picture The Kingsman.

55594220_2032176446832194_8087886883993944064_nGery Deer is a world-renowned veteran whip artist and coach and the founder of The Whip Artistry Studio in Jamestown, Ohio. Raised on a cattle farm in rural Ohio, he opened the studio in 1998 as the only permanent facility in the United States dedicated to the non-combative study of the whip for sports, fitness and performance art. The facility provides training for whip handling, targeting, competition performance, and fitness. Students of the whip studio include hobbyists, stage and stunt performers, and many performers who have worked as “Indiana Jones” in the Universal Studios’ Indiana Jones Stunt Spectacular. In addition to his work as a master whip coach, Gery has been a featured performer on stages around the country. He has appeared on countless television variety programs over his 30-year career including Steve Harvey’s Big Time, America’s Got Talent, The Bonnie Hunt Show, as well as the PBS series, Our Ohio. He also designs original whip holstering equipment and utility belts used by some of the largest production companies in the world including Universal Studios, Warner Brothers and 21st Century Fox.

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Greene County Security Company Celebrates Grand Opening of New Bellbrook Office

In Business, Dayton Ohio News, National News, Technology, Uncategorized on April 12, 2019 at 4:05 pm

April 11, 2019 – Bellbrook, Ohio – Safeguard Data and Security, LLC, has announced a public ribbon cutting and open house event at their new office, 5:30-7:30 PM, Thursday, April 25, at 70 Bellbrook Plaza, downtown Bellbrook, Ohio. The event will include an official ceremony to dedicate the new space immediately followed by an open house with free refreshments and a door prize drawing.

Safeguard Data and Security, LLC, was founded March 22nd of last year by Mike Pearson and Christina Pearson of Bellbrook. The firm specializes in residential and commercial video surveillance, alarm systems, 24-7 monitoring, access control, network cabling and more.

“We have been working hard to open an office and showroom space where customers can see for themselves the variety of security products and services we have to offer,” said Christina Pearson, co-owner and director of finance. “We specifically chose Bellbrook because we wanted to support and be more a part of the community where we live and where our kids go to school.”

Safeguard’s new showroom will include different versions of available Closed-Circuit TV (CCTV) cameras, home automation, and responsive lighting and alarm systems. Attendees of the grand opening will have the opportunity to win a number of door prizes, including a grand prize of a video doorbell system. This will give visitors the opportunity to learn about the company’s comprehensive offerings and dedication to the community.

Co-owner and president, Mike Pearson, said, “We offer our customers a vast knowledge of state-of-the-art products and personalized service,” he said. “We pride ourselves on providing an affordable solution for just about any security need, whether it’s an alarm inspection or a full security system for your commercial property.”

For more information, call Safeguard Data and Security, LLC, at 937-725-4204 or email info@safeguardyourworld.com.

GLD Enterprises Communications, LLC celebrates 21 years with new services and additional staff

In Business, Dayton Ohio News, Economy, finances, Local News, News Media, psychology, Uncategorized on April 4, 2019 at 10:09 am

April 3, 2019, Jamestown, Ohio – GLD Enterprises Communications, Ltd. of Jamestown, Ohio, has announced the expansion of their company with the addition of a new principal staffer and additional services. The firm’s announcements come as it celebrates 21 years in business.

Julie Barth, Director of Digital Media Communication

Founded in March of 1998, GLD Enterprises Communications, Ltd., is a marketing communications agency specializing in strategic marketing, copywriting, public relations, and creative development. The company’s CEO and founder is a lifelong entrepreneur, advertising award-winner and Pulitzer-nominated freelance journalist, Gery L. Deer.

To deepen the professional bench, Julie Barth has joined the agency as a partner in the role of Director of Digital Media Communication (Media Director). Her primary duties focus on audio and video development and production, media relations, digital content, and social media.

Originally from New Jersey, Barth earned a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Heidelberg University and recently graduated from the International College of Broadcasting in Dayton with a degree in Audio and Video production. She also supports some of the firm’s business development activities and represents them as a member of the leadership team of the Huber Heights chapter of the H7 Network business referral organization.

Because of the founder’s background, GLD Enterprises Communications, Ltd. strengths have always been in the creation of marcom content for clients. Therefore, in addition to traditional communications and PR services, the agency’s expansion includes audio-visual production, such as promotional videos and podcasting services, and a unique, highly successful audience-centric content marketing approach called, “HEO ™,” which stands for Human Engagement Optimization™.

“We are excited about this next chapter in the firm’s evolution,” said Deer. “Most advertisers are trying to reach people, not search engines. After all, who is it that buys their products or services? Google? No, it’s people. We develop content for our clients to engage with the human being on the other side of the screen.”

According to Deer, over the years, GLD Enterprises Communications, Ltd. has gone through many changes including name and focus. “We’re always learning, always adjusting to the needs of our clients and the market,” Deer said. “To stay stagnant is to go out of business, and how will that help the dozens of clients who depend on us? We will continue to evolve.”

For more information, visit the company’s website at www.gldenterprises.net, or connect on LinkedIn and Facebook.

 

Wild West show at Annie Oakley Festival to feature local performers

In Dayton Ohio News, Entertainment, history, Holiday, National News, Sports News, Uncategorized on July 16, 2018 at 7:19 am

 

Greenville, OH – Jamestown whip artist Gery L. Deer and Xenia thrown weapons expert, Kirk Bass, will lead a full troupe of whip artists, trick ropers, knife throwers and other Wild West arts experts during the 2018 American Western Arts Showcase during Annie Oakley Festival, July 27 and 28, at the Darke County Fairground in Greenville, Ohio. The event is free and open to the public.

Presented in the spirit of the stage-style Wild West shows of the late 19th Century, each production will include some detailed history about how these arts came to be and who still practices them today. In addition to performing, Gery Deer is also the show’s producer and chief backer.

“This is a one-of-a-kind show in this region,” Deer says. “We have some of the best Wild West arts entertainment anywhere in the Midwest with real practitioners of each skill,” says Deer, who started the event in Jamestown, Ohio, in 2002. “These are talented performers with genuine ability, no fakery, no tricks. Everything you see in our show is real and all of our shows are in 3-D and high definition!”

Champion knife thrower Kirk Bass, of Xenia, Ohio, is co-producer of the event. He and his daring wife Melodee are among the performers to take the open-air stage for two shows on Saturday, July 28 beginning at 1 p.m. with a series of western arts perform the suspenseful Bass Blades impalement show, and much more.

Whip marksmanship competitions headline the afternoon show beginning with the National Whip Speed and Accuracy Exhibition Competition, the world’s only Bullwhip Fast Draw contest. Plus, there is a brand new contest taken straight from the big screen.

AOF_3_GLD

In 1981, a fedora-wearing, leather-clad archaeologist threw the crack heard round the world when he “whipped” a pistol from the hand of a jungle guide. At the beginning of “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” Indiana Jones demonstrated his skills with the holstered fast-draw of a 10-foot bullwhip, all while having to spin around to take aim first.

In the spirit of Dr. Jones’ proficiency, this year’s Showcase competition will include a special “blind fast draw,” where whip artists must mimic the move used in the film to turn, draw their holstered whip and shoot at a target with speed and accuracy.

“With the popularity of Indiana Jones among western performers, particularly whip artists, it’s odd this hasn’t been done before,” says Deer, who holds multiple, national whip speed and accuracy titles and is the director of The Whip Artistry Studio, the only permanent whip training facility in America. Contests begin at 1 p.m., followed immediately by a matinee performance at 2:30.

At 5:00p.m., visitors to the festival will see the Grand Western Showcase hosted by AOF_5_GLDthe music and comedy of Greene County’s own, The Brothers & Co. Variety Show. “We pull out all the stops on Saturday evening,” says Deer. “The Brothers & Co. Variety Show is an Americana-styled musical variety show from a by-gone era, full of comedy, magic, and some of the best four-part music on stage today. There will be nothing else like this anywhere at the festival!”

The event is sponsored by GLD Enterprises Communications, Ltd., The Brothers & Co. Variety Show, and the Annie Oakley Festival Committee. All performances are family friendly and presented on the grounds of the Annie Oakley Festival. For links to the festival and sneak previews of the performers plus more information go online to ohiowesternarts.org.

Extends Deadline, 2018 WOWA anthology now open for submissions

In Books, Dayton Ohio News, Entertainment, Literature, Print Media, Uncategorized on July 7, 2018 at 10:59 am

Dayton, Ohio, June 1, 2018 –The Western Ohio Writers Association (WOWA) is now accepting short story fiction submissions for their 2018 anthology themed, “Redemption, Reinvention, Revenge” (final title TBA), targeted for publication in Q4 2018.

The Western Ohio Writers Association was founded in 2008 as a resource for writers of all genre in the southwestern Ohio, southeastern Indiana, and northwestern Kentucky region. The organization provides monthly critique sessions, networking opportunities, workshops and education, and creative support.

This will be WOWA’s second anthology, having published its first, “Flights of Fiction,” in 2013. This time, however, rather than only member authors, submissions are open to writers outside the group.

“We are looking for innovative short fiction between 2,500 and 7,500 words. Stories should have diverse appeal and must incorporate one or more of the anthology theme’s concepts,” explained WOWA Executive Director, Gery L. Deer.  “All submissions must be original works that have not been previously published. We will choose approximately 15 stories for this anthology.”

Submissions are open to fiction writers 18 and up who are permanent residents of the following Ohio counties: Brown, Butler, Champaign, Clarke, Clermont, Clinton, Darke, Fayette, Franklin, Greene, Hamilton, Highland, Madison, Miami, Montgomery, Preble, Warren. Authors do not need to be members of WOWA in order to submit.

Submissions will be accepted between May 1, 2018 and now extended to August 31, 2018. Please either upload your manuscript document through our Submission Form page or send it as an email attachment to submissions@westernohiowriters.com. No more than two submissions per author, please. We will reject stories that include explicit sex, brutality, or pervasive profanity. We do not accept simultaneous submissions.

Full details and submission guidelines are available online at www.westernohiowriters.com, click on “WOWA Publications.”

WordPress Conference, WordCamp, Returns To Dayton May 18-19

In Business, Dayton Ohio News, Education, Local News, Media, Technology, Uncategorized on May 3, 2018 at 3:20 pm

Dayton, Ohio, May 3, 2018 – The WordPress developer conference, WordCamp, returns to Dayton on May 18-19, 2018, as a two-day event packed with workshops, speakers and hands-on training for WordPress users of all skill levels. It will be held at a new location this year — the newly renovated Dayton Metro Library downtown. It is such a beautiful facility! General Admission tickets for both days are just $40!

WordPress is a free and open-source content management system for development of websites. The WordCamp conference is an informal, community-organized event that is put together by WordPress users. Everyone from casual users to core developers participates, shares ideas and gets to know each other.

The first WordCamp was organized in San Francisco by Matt Mullenweg in 2006. Since then, local communities around the world have organized over three hundred WordCamps, and we anticipate that number will pass a thousand within the next couple of years.

The tone and content of each WordCamp are unique based on the local communities that produce them, but in general, WordCamps include sessions on how to use WordPress more effectively, beginning plugin and theme development, advanced techniques, security, and marketing.

WordCamps are attended by people ranging from blogging newbies to professional WordPress developers and consultants, and usually combine scheduled programming with unconference sessions and other activities. For more information on common WordCamp elements, read about what to expect at a WordCamp. For more information or to order tickets, visit http://2018.dayton.wordcamp.org

Good Night, and Good Luck. The final installment of “Deer In Headlines.”

In Dayton Ohio News, Health, Home Improvement, Local News, News Media, Opinion, psychology, sociology, Uncategorized on May 2, 2018 at 12:32 pm

This edition of Deer In Headlines marks if you’ll pardon the dramatics, the end of an era, at least for me. The question I’ve been asked most often since announcing the end of the series is, “So what will you do now?”

Let me start by saying while an important part of my work over the last decade, this column is not all I’ve been doing, not by a longshot. I’ve run an ad agency, written thousands of published pieces on everything from public relations to marketing, and given lectures and workshops about the media and writing all around the region. I’ve covered a lot of ground and struggled with how best to say goodbye and then it occurred to me.

It has always been my goal to have readers to take something useful from my writings and I don’t want this final installment to be any different. Since it represents several hours a week in research and writing, in the hope of having a positive influence on the thoughts and lives of anyone I can reach, leaving this column behind is a big change for me.

For some people, change is the enemy, it throws them off their game and causes chaos and, for much of my life, it was the same for me. But in recent years, change has become more of a companion that walks through life with me, always nudging me in the side to never be complacent or stagnant either in my actions or my convictions.

We may not like it, but change is the natural order of things. Nothing stays the same for very long. As they say, “to everything there is a season,” and rather than fighting those changes, we should embrace them. It’s not easy, but it makes life more interesting and far less stressful.

It’s easy to see how change affects people in simple ways, like when a child graduates from high school or you move to a new town. We get caught up in happiness and sadness all at the same time, it twists our emotions and forces us to face new challenges and differences in our day-to-day lives. Of course, there are negative changes too, and we have to take the good with the bad. That’s just life.

We grow accustomed to how things are in our world and we’re thrown when it alters. We all know that person who has to have a cup of coffee at a certain time of day, with a specific amount of sugar, or just the right drop of cream. If those kinds of things aren’t met with an exacting order, he or she cannot function. The more flexible you are, the more enjoyable your life. Otherwise, you’re in a constant state of stress.

With that, I’ll take you back to the question of what I will be doing next. It is definitely a time of even more change for me. I’ve recently accepted a position as vice president of communications and public relations with a social internet company. That and caring for my father takes up most of my work time, but I have other projects as well.

I’m still doing television and writing for the print and online media from time to time. I’m concentrating my writing time on my fitness blog, The Old Nerd in The Gym (www.oldnerdinthegym.com). I’m hoping my work helps others who are new to fitness and more healthy living.

Life goes on and new challenges await. I’m just getting started. And that’s how you should feel today too. Treat every day as bringing new opportunity to learn, grow, and achieve, regardless of how great or small the accomplishment and embrace that change! Your future isn’t written yet, so get out there and make it a good one!

With that, it’s time for Deer In Headlines to pass into the newspaper archives. Thank you for indulging me every week and, whether you agreed with me or not, I hope you got something useful or insightful from my ramblings. So, I’ll borrow a classic sign off from a news hero of mine, Edward R. Murrow, and simply say Good Night, and Good Luck.

Can’t we all just get along?

In Health, history, News Media, Opinion, Politics, psychology, sociology, Uncategorized on May 1, 2018 at 12:14 pm

With only two issues of Deer In Headlines remaining, I felt that one of them should be dedicated to a discussion about civility and the destructive nature of hate. In short, we must try to get along better, regardless of political, religious, or socioeconomic differences.

Over the last few years, our country has become severely divided. There is a level of anger, hate, and mistrust out there now, the likes of which haven’t been seen since before the Civil War. Back then the division was primarily focused on slavery and states’ rights, but today Americans are arguing about a laundry list of issues from immigration to gun control.

Not that these topics haven’t caused discourse in the past, but now it’s fueled by an alarmingly, and continually advancing, level of anger and hatred. The radical right has become sickeningly intolerant to the point of disgust and the liberal left has grown increasingly less “liberal.” I mean you simply can’t say, “I’m liberal, and we love everyone, so long as they agree with everything we say.” Doesn’t work that way.

President Donald Trump took advantage of this divide and used it to gain traction in his run for the White House. Now, he waffles back and forth, blustering on Twitter about how great he is, while alienating even his own base at times with his ridiculous rants. Democrats turn their noses up at him and his cronies and their flagrant hypocrisy, all while crying in their soup about how he got this far in American government. Well, Dems, I’ll tell you who put him there, you did.

Political viewpoints have become so foggy that no one can tell who is for what anymore. The reason Trump won the presidential election wasn’t his winning personality, or Russian hacking, or anything else. It was because the Democratic base was so splintered and stubborn over Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders that they couldn’t just get behind one of them and move on.

That’s right Dems, as I have written before, you handed the White House to Donald on a silver platter. Remember that primaries and midterms happen this year and any failure to weaken Trump’s hold in Congress is totally in your hands. All you have to do is get out and vote!

All of that said, we must be able to return to a level of productive, constructive discourse. We should be able to disagree and have informed, intelligent debate on a topic instead of a bickering match. What’s the point of discussion with no purpose except to out-scream everyone else?

Much of the problem comes from the extremist mentalities once relegated to the fringe but which now seem to be in the majority. There is nothing wrong with liberals and conservatives cooperating for a common good. We can disagree yet still work toward the betterment of our society – but that doesn’t seem to be possible right now.

We are dealing with mass shootings made possible by the bizarre need of a tiny few to own military-grade machine guns should be something we can all agree is nuts. But that doesn’t seem to be the case. Instead, our country is overwhelmed by people obsessed with these weapons and backed by a massively powerful gun lobby from the NRA. Clearly, money is more important to these people than our kids.

Execution of warped immigration policies based on ignorance and hate that mistreat productive members of society rather than helping them with a path to proper citizenship. We should be rewarding people for feeling our country is a safe home for their families, not punishing them. It’s all ridiculous.

The long and short of it is that we must find a way to get along better. If we don’t learn to dial back the extremism and let cooler, more diplomatic heads rule, our country is in big trouble. So, for what it’s worth, I think we’re capable of doing better.

But all of that requires that each of us learns to be more compassionate, more tolerant, and more thoughtful. Since I won’t be around to poke you in the side after next week, remember to be good to each other.

Rounding up a decade of Deer In Headlines

In Dayton Ohio News, Entertainment, Local News, News Media, Opinion, Politics, Religion, Technology, Uncategorized on April 16, 2018 at 8:12 am

Deer In Headlines
By Gery L. Deer

I wasn’t quite sure how to start this week’s edition except to just come out with it. The week of April 30, 2018, will be the final print edition of Deer In Headlines. After 10 years, it’s time for me to focus on something new. I greatly appreciate the loyalty of my readers and the opposing views and letters of praise I’ve received over the years. If just one person each week looked at the world just a little differently and appreciated anything new, I’ve accomplished my goal.

I started this column to offer my readers a look at subjects from all sides, rarely giving a hint of my personal opinion, although it was evident when I chose for it to be.  But today clear, logical viewpoints no longer have value. People seem to listen only to blowhards, the ignorant, and people who would rather spew hate than kindness. That’s why I have decided to focus on more positive projects, out of the public eye.

This is not a decision I’ve come to lightly, in fact, I have waivered numerous times in my deliberations about it. Over the last decade, I’ve offered a look at politics, religion, education, science, family, and even given you a glimpse into my personal life as I cared for my parents.

We live in volatile times and some have argued that now is when we need a clearer, more rational voice in the media. They may be right, but mine is simply not loud enough to be heard above all the noise of anger, fear, and ignorance out there.

There is a lot of negativity out there and I have worked hard to bring you thoughtful content. I’ve always hoped you’d take away something from the effort, even if, especially if, you didn’t agree with me.

I’ve always said I like to surround myself with smart people who disagree with me because it means I am forced to examine my own convictions, and I hope I’ve done that for you from time to time. If you’ve enjoyed my work, thank you. I appreciate your time and loyalty. If you haven’t, then I’m not sure why you’re even reading this, but, thank you anyway.

For more than 500 editions and in some 360,000 words, I have shared my observations of the world around us. I’ve found that most people are good and decent and try to do their best to improve the world around them. I’ve also seen some ugly things in researching these pieces, information I kind of wish I had never learned. As they say, ignorance is bliss, but I’m afraid I don’t operate that way.

I will continue my work quietly, however, in the background, making a difference by other means. I serve on charitable boards of directors, care for my family, and work to affect change in more concrete ways.

The world is a mess and our country is too, but I can’t do anything about it in the rail column of a newspaper because the people who could make a difference simply don’t want to listen. Still, as ugly as it can seem at times, the world is also a beautiful place, one of a kind – a spinning ball of life making its way around the sun, year after year, as our galaxy moves through the vast emptiness of space.

It was here millions of years before us, and it’ll be here millions of years after we’ve gone. We are but renters and if I were the landlord, I wouldn’t give back the deposit. But that’s a discussion for another time.

As you can see, I’m not done with my opinions quite yet and there are two editions to go. Over the next couple of weeks, I’ll be summing up the last decade in a look back at a few of my predictions for politics, newsmakers, and various other areas I’ve touched on over the years. I hope you’ll join me in these last editions, and thank you again.

Remote work builds community, grows revenue

In Business, Economy, Education, finances, Jobs, Local News, National News, Opinion, Technology, Uncategorized on February 26, 2018 at 10:22 am

Deer In Headlines
By Gery L. Deer

As an entrepreneur, I have founded and grown three businesses over the last two decades. Each of them was started from my home office and eventually moved to another building, but still on my home properly.

When I first became an independent professional and started my own company, there was a stigma attached to “working from home.” For some reason, what we now refer to as remote workers were seen as less professional than our cubicle-bound counterparts.

Today, remote work, whether it’s from home or your favorite café, is becoming more common and better accepted by the business world. Remote workers are found in a variety of industries from journalism and finance to business coaching to insurance.

For all of that, however, there are essentially just two categories of remote worker. The first type, we used to call “telecommuters,” or people who are employed by a company which allows them to work from home or other off-site location.

According to a recent Gallup survey, 43 percent of all American employees work remotely at least some of the time. The survey found that workers who spent up to 80 percent of time outside the office had the highest rates of engagement. They were more productive and reported greater job satisfaction.

The remote work support informational website, Remote.com, noted also that remote workers exhibit lower stress and better morale. It also noted a lower rate of absenteeism.

The second type of remote worker is the independent professional, or what most people would commonly refer to as a freelancer. Many freelancers, like myself and other writers or consultants, are almost totally nomadic, needing only a computer and a Wi-Fi connection to be productive.

In the past, most “freelancers” were expected to be writers, photographers, artists, and the like. But today, independent, remote workers come from a variety of market sectors. Coding, for example, is more commonly a remote job. Coders develop websites, create apps, and work in areas like cybersecurity.

Perhaps one of the greatest advantages of remote work, either to a corporate employer or a freelancer, is significantly reduced overhead. For a freelancer, setting up an office could be impractical, operationally and financially. Large companies with off-site staff can save millions of dollars a year in real estate, utilities, and other overhead costs.

Another benefit to working outside the corporate maze is potential interaction with a larger business community and the collaboration that can result from those connections. Many independents and corporate remotes are getting together at co-working meetup events, giving them the opportunity to network and collaborate.

As much social as it is professional, the experience allows those workers who might spend a great deal of the time working alone to build a community. Plus, there are also opportunities for a more formalized co-working environment.

Co-share workspaces have cropped up around the country offering remote workers a member-based workspace and the chance to exchange ideas and projects with others. These spaces charge memberships that come with various amenities that could be as little as a desk space or multi-employee workspaces, with many different types of independent professional under one roof.

If you’re a business owner with jobs to fill that don’t necessarily require the employee to be on-site all the time, consider hiring a remote worker. Remote and independent professionals are the ideal self-starter, typically efficient time managers, and are less likely to contribute to high turnover.

You won’t be sorry, and it’s the future of work. Embracing it now and developing policies and procedures will put your business light-years ahead of everyone else. Flexibility can greatly encourage productivity and increase profits.

For remote professionals looking for a co-working community, just visit Meetup.com and search on “Dayton co-working.” Most of the activities are free of charge, except for whatever refreshments you might purchase on your own. Or visit deerinheadlines.com for some links to local co-working activities scheduled throughout the area.

 

REMOTE WORK RESOURCES:

Co-Working Meetup / Yellow Springs: https://www.meetup.com/Creative-Pros-Collaborative/

Job Postings: https://weworkremotely.com/

Working Remotely (Twitter): https://twitter.com/workingrem

Resources for Full-Time Freelancers: https://www.themuse.com/advice/every-resource-a-fulltime-freelancer-could-ever-need-plus-some

Business Consulting / Coaching for Remote Workers & Freelancers: http://www.gldenterprises.net

Gery L. Deer is an independent columnist and business writer. Deer In Headlines is distributed by GLD Enterprises Communications, Ltd. More at gerydeer.com