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Beavercreek Chamber of Commerce presents, “Bourbon & Blues,” April 8, at The Mall at Fairfield Commons

In Local News on March 31, 2022 at 9:55 am

The Beavercreek Chamber of Commerce proudly presents, “Bourbon & Blues” from 6 – 9 PM on Friday, April 8, 2022, at The Mall at Fairfield Commons (2727 Fairfield Cmns, Beavercreek, OH 45431). The event is open to the public and is located on the upper level of the former Elder-Beerman storefront, on the northwest side of the mall. Tickets are $30 for chamber members and $40 for non-members and are available by scanning the QR code included with this article, or from the chamber’s website, www.beavercreekchamber.org/bourbon-blues. All proceeds and generous support by, “Blues Sponsor,” Wesbanco, and, “Supporting Sponsor,” Tru by Hilton, support the Beavercreek Chamber’s ongoing community initiatives.

Bourbon & Blues is a bourbon-tasting event full of great food, entertainment, and prizes. It will feature bourbon tastings from Indian Creek Distillery, delicious appetizers from local restaurants including Casa Nunez, Melt, and Flyby BBQ, and desserts provided by Nothing Bundt Cakes and Church Street Cookies. Additional beverages will be available as well, courtesy of BJ’s Brewhouse.

Other entertainment includes a painting performance by Raise Your Brush and chances to win some great raffle prizes. Local vendors will also be there showcasing a variety of area products and services.  

For more information, contact Wendy Rodgers or Chris McClure at the Chamber office at (937) 426-2202 or info@beavercreekchamber.org.

GLD Enterprises Communications, Ltd. signs an industry-diverse list of new Dayton area clients.

In Local News on December 27, 2021 at 5:29 pm

December 27, 2021 – Jamestown, Ohio -GLD Enterprises Communications, Ltd. (GLD (http://gldcommunications.com)), founder, and creative director, Gery Deer (https://www.linkedin.com/in/gerydeer/), has announced his firm has signed several new, high-profile local clients to kick-off an aggressive start to 2022. The new clientele adds to an already industry-diverse book of business that serves non-profits to mortgage lenders and launches an anniversary first quarter for the privately-held, Greene County, Ohio-based public relations and media communications firm.


“We’re excited to be working with local organizations, which are mostly underserved by regional agencies who are often too busy trying to make a name with big, out-of-state clients,” Deer said. “Our PR and media services have a national reach, but I prefer to focus our work here at home, to maintain low overhead low and put our resources into serving the clients. I think clients deserve effective work, at a competitive cost, from a hometown agency that understands both their mission and their audience.”


As a result, GLD has turned its attention to the Dayton region, with work that varies both in industry and scope. In mid-December, the company became the public relations (PR) agency of record for the Beaver Creek Wetlands Association. The non-profit organization helps to preserve and protect the wetlands and in Greene County, Ohio region through conservation, education, recreational opportunities, and stewardship. 


Additionally, the Beavercreek Chamber of Commerce has also been signed as a technology and media communications consulting client. The agency assists with media production and technology issues and will play a role in the development and production of the chamber’s annual meeting in March.


Lastly, Young’s Jersey Dairy will be a featured title sponsor on the agency’s house production, “3-2-1 PROFITS – THE PODCAST (http://321profitspodcast.com).” Dan Young and his son John will be featured as part of a 2-part premiere of the program’s second season, dropping January 15th. As part of this project, GLD will serve as a media consultant for a proposed podcast from Young’s covering agricultural and related industry topics.

GLD Enterprises Communications, Ltd., was founded in 1997 by Gery L. Deer of Jamestown, Ohio, as part-time information technology and public relations firm. Less than a year later, the company had a full-time volume of sales and annual revenue that far outstripped Deer’s previous day job. Media Director Julie Barth joined the firm in 2019 to head up the audio-video department and helped to expand the firm’s capacity for full media production, including the development of several in-house productions, such as, “3-2-1 PROFITS – THE PODCAST.”

GLD Enterprises Communications, Ltd.
Creative Director, Gery Deer


Thanks to its creative structure and fully-remote staff, the agency was already positioned to thrive during the pandemic and continued throughout to service and onboard new work. Deer announced this latest list of work as the company prepares to launch its 25th-anniversary celebration that will run through Q1 of 2022. The commemoration will include a series of specially-themed public relations and audio-video production packages leading up to an exclusive live event in March and the relaunch of one of the company’s original services (TBA), and a few other surprises.


For more information or to learn more about GLD Enterprises Communications, Ltd., please call 937-675-6169 or visit gldcommunications.com (http://gldcommunications.com). Full details on services and promotions through the Beavercreek Chamber of Commerce here – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yw7_eJBwiE8&t=36s

Exclusive Home Technology Help available without referral only until Thanksgiving!

In Business, Economy, Education, Entertainment, Senior Lifestyle, State News, Technology, Uncategorized on November 2, 2020 at 12:42 pm

Let’s face it, home technology has advanced by leaps and bounds over the last decade. The pandemic has driven even more changes no one could have predicted. Families who are still sequestered at home due to COVID-19 are increasingly dependent on the internet and all of the devices needed to make use of it. (CALL TODAY 937-675-6169)

In addition, a larger number of homes now use smart technology to manage things like security, heating and air systems, and, of course, entertainment. A typical home now has up 10 different devices connected to one wi-fi access point. Plus, more people working from home means exponentially increased requirements on bandwidth both upload and download.

If you’re having trouble with your computers, tablets, smart devices, or other internet-enabled equipment, we can help. Exclusive Home Technology Help is now available in Greene, Clinton, Montgomery, and Fayette Counties in Ohio.

We work primarily by referral, but from now until Thanksgiving 2020, you can get our exclusive, residential technology support service right to your door for as little as *$50.

EHTH works exclusively with residential clients and those with a home office. Services include: Computer Troubleshooting & Repair, Wi-Fi Signal Survey & Report, Virtual Meeting Setup Help, Home Automation Setup and Tech Support, and more.

We don’t have a website or a Facebook page. Why? Because every extra will cost you, the consumer, in paying our overhead costs. We have a landline phone number and an email address. Leave a message and someone will return your call within 24 hours. Hardware pick-up and drop-off are available for an additional charge.

SO DON’T WAIT – CALL TODAY! 937-675-6169! After Thanksgiving, you can’t get our services without a referral from an existing customer!

**Referral bonus: If you refer someone who ends up using our services, you’ll receive a $10 Amazon Gift Card!

*Starting service fee is $50 and then $35 for each additional hour.

**Referral Bonus applies to referred client spending a minimum of $150.

Jamestown Marketing Firm Produces Video Series Greene County Council On Aging

In Charities, Dayton Ohio News, Health, Local News, Senior Lifestyle on November 6, 2019 at 5:01 pm
Free Legal Chat educational series went live in October and includes a podcast companion.
Xenia, Ohio November 6, 2019Jamestown-based marketing firm, GLD Enterprises Communications, Ltd., has produced a series of informational videos and companion podcasts for the Greene County Council On Aging. Titled, “GCCOA Legal Chat,” each program covers a common legal question affecting seniors and caregivers, ranging from wills and probate to guardianship. The videos are now available free of charge on the GCCOA’s YouTube channel and the audio programs can be found by searching for “Greene County Council on Aging” on most podcast streaming services such as Spotify and Stitcher. Direct Video Link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCseUznkCiXQ_lUMgMQKN-xQ

GLD Enterprises Communications, Ltd. is a strategic, creative marketing agency founded in 1998 by Gery writer/entrepreneur Gery L. Deer. The firm provides everything from business consulting, public relations and branding to digital marketing, content creation and campaign implementation. The agency expanded in January of 2019 to include in-house audio and video production overseen by Julie Barth, who joined the firm at that time as Media Director.

“I’ve been a caregiver to both my parents over the last decade and I produced these programs with people like me in mind,” said Gery Deer, GLD Enterprises Communications, Ltd. Owner and Creative Director. “The Greene County Council on Aging does a wonderful job helping inform and educate seniors and caregivers and this series is just another in a long history of that commitment.”

The Greene County Council on Aging is a not-for-profit, county-wide organization that promotes independence and quality of life for Greene County senior citizens and caregivers. GCCOA was originally established in 1979 and is governed by a Board of Directors. The Council’s primary funding source is the 1.4 mil Senior Services Levy renewed in 2019.

GCCOA provides a broad range of services and programs, including the Partners in Care (PIC) care management program, the Kinship Navigator Program (for grandparents raising grandchildren and other individuals raising someone else’s child), educational and support programs for caregivers, a caregiver resource center, and service grants to area senior centers and other service providers.

Each video and podcast features GCCOA Benefits Coordinator, Susan Allen, speaking with Attorney Dave Cusack, of Cusack Law Offices in Beavercreek, Ohio. The series was designed to supplement the GCCOA’s live informational sessions to offer valuable the same information to those who are unable to attend in person.

Books and Co. hosts live reading by local authors of WOWA, June 19

In Books, Children and Family, Dayton Ohio News, Education, Entertainment, history, Local News, psychology, Technology on June 15, 2015 at 5:38 pm

IMG_0030Beavercreek, OH – Beginning at 7pm on Friday, June 19, author members of the Western Ohio Writers Association (WOWA) will take the microphone at Books & Co. to present their popular, “Beatnik Café” event. Writers from all genres will regale visitors with original works of poetry and prose to the theme, “Leave No Trace.” The event is free and open to the public.

The live reading pays homage to the hole-in-the-wall poetry clubs of the 1960’s, but with a more modern style. Reading aloud from original work, each writer will take the stage for 10 to 12 minutes, dazzling audiences with short stories, poetry or who knows what.

Barbara Deer is the co-founder of the organization. “WOWA was intended to provide a regular resource for peer critique, educational programs and networking opportunities to local writers of all genres, both amateur and professional,” she says. (Click to watch the television interview about last summer’s Beatnik from WDTN-TV2, Living Dayton 6-12-2014)

Barbara Deer, WOWA co-founder.

Barbara Deer, WOWA co-founder.

“Annual workshops are held all around the country, with two of the most well-known right here in the Miami Valley. But for most writers to thrive that type of support needs to come on a more regular basis,” Deer says. “Our group consists of professional writers and editors, college professors and everyone is ready and willing to offer help, a fresh eye and, sometimes more importantly, an honest opinion about the quality of the work – good or bad.”

wowa-beatnik

Writers come from all around the region – southwest central Ohio, eastern Indiana and northern Kentucky – to attend monthly critique sessions, educational lectures and write-in events. Meetings are held on the first Thursday of the month at the Event Connections, 4140 Linden Ave. in Dayton, near the intersection of US 35 and Woodman Drive.

WOWA Logo 2Now in its seventh year, this talented group of scribes definitely have plenty to celebrate. In addition to the many individual members who have been published on their own, in May of this year eleven of them were featured in an anthology titled, “Flights of Fiction,” produced by GLD Enterprises Commercial Writing and published by Handcar Press (ISBN: 978-0-9885289-4-9). The book features stories set in and around the southwest Ohio region and is available in print and electronic formats from the WOWA website as well as Amazon and BN.com.

The Beatnik Café is a family-friendly, free, public presentation of WOWA and GLD Enterprises Communications. Books & Co. is located at 4453 Walnut St. at The Greene in Beavercreek. For more information, go online to www.westernohiowriters.org or call (937) 902-4857.

More money needed to combat child poverty

In Children and Family, Economy, National News, Opinion, Politics, sociology on May 19, 2015 at 11:51 am

Deer In Headlines
By Gery L. Deer

DIH LOGOFor many Americans, a day of suffering might include a flat tire on the way to work, the cable going out right before a favorite program, or a long line at the coffee shop. But for millions of children, suffering means doing without basic necessities like proper nutrition and even the most basic health care.

According to the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP), more than 16 million children in the United States live in families with income below the poverty level of $23,550. That’s a staggering 22-percent of all the kids in the country.

Some people today believe that childhood poverty in America is something from the past. In fact, one in six children in the United States lives below the poverty line.

Some people today believe that childhood poverty in America is something from the past. In fact, one in six children in the United States lives below the poverty line.

Despite the political rhetoric, generally coming from conservatives who feel poverty is a problem of the lazy, the NCCP reports that most of the parents of these children do indeed work. But low wages and in unstable employment situations continue to restrict any sort of progress for them. Experts agree that poverty is the single greatest threat to the welfare of American children in modern society.

In addition, for those who believe that poverty is a problem mainly suffered by minorities, here are some statistics. The NCCP reports that among America’s poorest children, 4.2 million are white, 4 million are Latino, 3.6 million are African American, 400,000 are Asian, and 200,000 are American Indian. That’s right; the majority of American kids living in poverty are white. But, clearly, the numbers are fairly close, so it’s certainly clear that poverty doesn’t seem to discriminate.

Red Nose DayMost of what’s needed to help this problem involves, as always, more money. There just isn’t enough funding through government social service programs to provide the needed services to support poverty-stricken children and younger adults. The National Broadcasting Company (NBC), along with charity partners such as Boys and Girls Clubs of America and Feeding America, is sponsoring a national day of awareness and fund-raising called, “Red Nose Day,” on Thursday, May 21st.

The United Way of Orange County, California explained the event on their website, “The campaign encourages everyone from children to corporations to do something fun in the name of raising awareness around a serious global issue, while also raising funds to help identify and deliver solutions. Red Nose Day USA activities culminate in a 3-hour telethon airing on NBC Saturday May 21 at 8pm.”

In addition to events like Red Nose Day, people are encouraged to help out in whatever capacity available to them, and it’s not just about writing a check. Those interested in volunteering can check with their local chapter of The United Way or other social service organizations to find out more.

Living in the richest, most powerful country in the world should inherently provide some kind of security for a child, at the very least with regard to food and shelter. Without proper living conditions, a child will simply not be able to learn well and that makes school less of a priority than eventually helping the family to support itself.

Children who can’t learn or leave school will only continue the cycle of poverty in many instances, forever locking themselves into the lowest paying work, when employment is even available.

So the question begs to be asked, “Can’t the government do more?” Yes, it can. But it hasn’t, and it probably won’t. Annually, only a pittance of tax dollars is allocated towards this problem and local social service programs are continually scaled back because of lack of funding.

Even the great Affordable Healthcare Act (a.k.a. Obamacare), which was supposed to provide health insurance for America’s poorest citizens, has made no significant difference. Because of its incredibly complicated application procedures, among other reasons, the program has thoroughly failed to meet healthcare needs of these children and their families.

Even if someone only has a little more, there is always a way to help those with far less. Red Nose Day is a fun start, but there needs to be more done to help those living in poverty. Congress (liberal and conservative alike) and the president share the blame for this tragic disfigurement of American culture. It’d be interesting to see how they would handle living without the six-figure salaries and free insurance.

 

Gery L. Deer is an independent columnist and business writer. Deer In Headlines is distributed by GLD Enterprises Communications. More at gerydeer.com

Yoga studio ribbon cutting and free class in Beavercreek May 19

In Business, Dayton Ohio News, Economy, Education, Health, Religion on May 5, 2015 at 1:05 am

Innerlight Yoga and Wellness offers a variety of classes.

Innerlight Yoga and Wellness offers a variety of classes.

Beavercreek, OH  – Innerlight Yoga and Wellness invites the public to share in celebration as they cut the ribbon on a new facility and celebrate a second anniversary in Beavercreek. A free open house is scheduled for 5:00PM, Tuesday, May 19, 2015, at the new location, 1265 N Fairfield Road, with the official ribbon cutting ceremony slated for 5:30PM. Open house visitors are also invited to attend a free, 45-minute, “all levels” yoga class beginning at 6:15PM, RSVP requested.

Jen Ater is the owner of Innerlight Yoga and Wellness. She has been teaching since 2005 and holds a master’s degree from Antioch University in yoga studies with a focus on yoga therapy.

Ater started out in Indiana but opened her first studio in Yellow Springs, Ohio in 2008, then moved to Beavercreek five years later. Innerlight Yoga and Wellness offers somewhere between 24 and 26 classes each week ranging from gentle, restorative yoga to more active, hot power yoga. The studio also offers private yoga sessions, massage, yoga therapy, and other wellness services.

“We have a wide variety of classes, as a human being shows up in many different body shapes and sizes, different ages, different health and mobility issues,” said Ater.  “So, I find that it’s important to offer yoga that’s available for everyone and make it as inclusive as possible.”

Jen Ater, Instructor and owner of Innerlight Yoga and Wellness.

Jen Ater, Instructor and owner of Innerlight Yoga and Wellness.

“I try, on the fly, to present yoga to all different types of people in a down-to-earth way,” said Ater, who, over the years, has taught yoga in diverse settings from chiropractic offices to juvenile detention centers. “Sometimes maybe I failed, but I think that someone who is truly successful has to fail quite a lot in order to really know what they’re doing.”

“I don’t think there’s anyone with as much experience teaching in as many different environments,” she suggested. “And people like the simplicity of our studio. It’s well-kept and organized. It’s also not an overly feminine environment, but very neutral in terms of feminine or masculine.”

Outreach is also a big part of the mission at Innerlight. “I am not

Watch Jen Ater on WDTN, TV2's LIVING DAYTON --- http://wdtn.com/2015/05/14/innerlight-yoga-wellness/

Watch Jen Ater on WDTN, TV2’s LIVING DAYTON — http://wdtn.com/2015/05/14/innerlight-yoga-wellness/

happy, unless I feel like I’m helping people,” explained Ater. Although the programs are not yet in order, Ater has a history of organizing community outreach programs such as the YS Youth Yoga Project, a grant-funded free yoga immersion for Yellow Springs School’s students and staff. “Three percent of the studio’s revenue will go towards outreach programs to bring yoga to schools and other organizations that cannot afford to provide classes,” she continued. “We want to make a difference, on many levels.”

Light refreshments will be provided at the open house, and space is limited for free yoga class, so those interested in attending are asked to RSVP by email to Erin at info@innerlightwellness.net. For more on classes and schedules, call 937-306-8235 or visit Innerlight Yoga and Wellness online at http://www.innerlightwellness.net. CLICK HERE to watch the WDTN-TV2 interview with Jen Ater.

Greene County Treasurer a Panelist in National Legislative Conference

In Local News, News Media, Politics, Sports News, State News, Uncategorized on March 10, 2015 at 5:55 pm

Gould

Gould

Xenia, Ohio, March 10, 2015 — Greene County Treasurer, Dick Gould, served as a panelist educating attendees about county investment policies and practices at the National Association of Counties (NACo) annual Legislative Conference February 21 – 25 in Washington D.C.

Joining Gould on the panel were David Messerly, Director of Global Investor Relations for FHLBanks and Jim Powell, Senior Vice-President of Multi-Bank Securities, Inc. Included in the discussion were the impact of interest rates, strategies for approaching investment opportunities, policy restrictions, and best practices.  The session included a question and answer session with participants.

“For counties, interest rates are a double-edged sword,” says Gould.  “Given the historically low rates, investment income has decreased dramatically.  Yet borrowing costs are also down and the county has been able to restructure much of its debt to save costs.”

More than 1500 county leaders attended the national conference, which offered workshops featuring county officials and other leaders in the public, private and nonprofit sectors. Vice President Joe Biden, who began his political career as a Delaware County council member, was the opening speaker at the event.

Dick Gould has been Greene County’s Treasurer since 2011.  He is a Certified Public Accountant and holds a Master of Accountancy from Miami University, Ohio.

A national, online university is impractical.

In Economy, Education, finances, history, National News, Opinion, Technology, Uncategorized on March 9, 2015 at 12:59 pm

DIH LOGOA recent CNN.com article by Kevin Carey proposed the idea that America could bring to reality George Washington’s dream of a national university by utilizing the Internet-based programs of existing institutions. Colleges and universities already receive millions every year in federal money, so some of that could be allocated towards low-tuition, online education. Good idea in concept, but not practical.

Although Internet-based programs have been in place for some time at universities around the country, many educators still believe that online education lacks the face-to-face contact necessary for students to connect with the subtleties of concepts and ideas. Questions cannot be answered immediately and written communication skills become more vital since intent and personality don’t always come across the same way virtually as in person.

Obviously, online options are not well-suited for every course of study, particularly where hands-on work is vital, such as the physical sciences or engineering. The ITDL article notes that videos would need to be produced, substantially increasing costs, while still lacking in the ability for students to get direct, immediate feedback. Flaws aside for a moment, online options have some positive aspects as well.

booksA few years ago, one article in the International Journal of Instructional Technology and Distance Learning noted that some educators employ online discussion boards to compensate for absent face time. One professor referenced in the article also suggested that, “a virtual environment reduces gender differences,” creating a more equal educational setting for men and women.

A national university could potentially be cobbled together from existing web-based programs and at a considerable savings. With online education there are fewer administrative issues, no buildings to construct and no libraries to collect.

But if the intent of such a program would be a stepping stone towards achieving President Obama’s promises of free community college education, further examination is probably needed. On the surface, a virtually-based, national community college program looks like a great solution to a daunting issue. Digging down, however, the financial and educational factors that sparked the idea in the first place would also be its greatest hindrance.

In order for such a program to be of value, it would need to be within the reach of the poorest of American citizens. Computers, for all they seem readily available by the upper-middle class, are still fiscally out of reach for those of lower income.

A computer at the local library is great for submitting job resumes or checking Facebook, but long-term study on public computers is impractical and insecure. Add to that most public computers are painfully slow and out-of-date, with restricted web search capability, and they seem like a thoroughly impossible option.

Additionally, free (or nearly free) dial-up Internet access would be wholly insufficient for higher learning programs so students would need to use high-speed broadband service. Once again, pricing and accessibility become the major issues. It simply costs too much for most lower-income families to afford high-speed Internet service and, in rural communities, availability remains shockingly limited.

Finally, there is the issue of prerequisite education. Besides whatever background might be needed for enrollment and future success in any particular program, a lack of computer skills can also hamper online class work.

The average computer user has a parenthetical set of skills: they can surf the web (but tend to stay on websites they know how to navigate), use a simple word processor, send a basic email (without attachments), print something and turn the machine off and on. That’s pretty much it.

Some of college coursework would require the student to possess advanced computer skills related to online research, clerical software manipulation, media production and so on. That might be a problem for someone coming from a background of limited resources or a family where technology didn’t play a major role.

None of this is impossible, but the limits on infrastructure, funding and practicality might be too great a challenge to reach those who would most benefit. An online program alone is just not the answer to America’s higher education deficiencies. Sorry George, no national university just yet. But, hopefully, there are some smart people out there trying to make something like it a reality in the near future.

Gery L. Deer is an independent columnist and business writer. Deer In Headlines is distributed by GLD Enterprises Communications. More at gerydeer.com.

WOWA’s Beatnik Cafe, “Here Be Dragons,” Jan 16 at Books & Co.

In Books, Children and Family, crafts, Dayton Ohio News, Entertainment, Literature, Local News, Media, State News, Theatre, Uncategorized on January 5, 2015 at 9:50 am

Graphic design by Michael Martin.

Graphic design by Michael Martin.

Beavercreek, OH – Once upon a time, sailors threatened to hang their captains from the yard arm if they ventured beyond a certain point in the sea. Venturing out into the unknown is something about which writers are far too familiar. At 7PM on Friday January 16, authors from the Western Ohio Writers Association will perform their own original tales of uncharted territory at their Winter 2015 Beatnik Cafe event at Books & Co. at The Greene. This quarter’s theme is, “Here be dragons, stories of adventure, exploration and uncharted territory.”

The WOWA Beatnik Cafe reading is a quarterly presentation that pays homage to the hole-in-the-wall poetry clubs of the 1960’s, but with a more modern style. Performing original work, each writer will take the mic to dazzle audiences with short stories, poetry or who knows what. The event is free and open to the public.

Jamestown writer, Barbara Deer, is the co-founder of the organization. “WOWA was intended to provide a regular resource for peer critique, educational programs and networking opportunities to local writers of all genres, both amateur and professional,” she says. “The Beatnik Café offers the public a chance for a glimpse at some of the most talented writers in the region as they showcase their work, in person, to entertain and enlighten.”

“Our group consists of professional and hobbyist writers, all of whom check their egos at the door,” Deer continues. “All are willing to offer help, a fresh eye and, sometimes more importantly, an honest opinion about the quality of the work – good or bad.”

600_376854182Writers come from all around the region – southwest central Ohio, eastern Indiana and northern Kentucky – to attend monthly workshops, critique sessions, educational lectures and write-in events. Meetings are held on the first Thursday of the month at the Event Connections, 4140 Linden Ave. in Dayton, near the intersection of US 35 and Woodman Drive.

About to embark on its seventh year, WOWA members definitely have plenty to celebrate. In addition to the many individual members who have been published on their own, in May of this year eleven of them were featured in an anthology titled, “Flights of Fiction,” produced by GLD Enterprises Commercial Writing and published by Loconeal Publishing (ISBN: 978-0-9885289-4-9). The book features stories set in and around the southwest Ohio region and is available in print and electronic formats from the WOWA website as well as Amazon and BN.com.

The Beatnik Café is a family-friendly presentation of WOWA and GLD Enterprises Communications. Books & Co. is located at 4453 Walnut St. at The Greene in Beavercreek. For more information, go online to http://www.westernohiowriters.org or call (937) 902-4857.

Watch the Video Interview from October’s Beatnik with co-founder Barbara Deer on WDTN-TV2’s Living Dayton

WOWA-LD_MASKS_SCREENSHOT