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Posts Tagged ‘downtown’

Possible meth lab explosion in downtown Jamestown

In Dayton Ohio News, Local News, National News, News Media, Uncategorized on March 21, 2014 at 8:42 am
Jamestown home at 10 S. Buckles ripped apart by possible meth lab explosion. Photo courtesy WKEF-22 News Video.

Jamestown home at 10 S. Buckles ripped apart by possible meth lab explosion. Photo courtesy WKEF-22 News Video.

JAMESTOWN – Authorities say an explosion in Jamestown on Thursday was possibly caused by a man in a home-based meth lab.

Firefighters were called to a house at 10 S. Buckles St. in Jamestown  around 1:30 pm on Thursday, March 20 where an explosion had rocked the neighborhood. Police say Shaun Minney was air lifted to an area hospital to be treated for severe burns. Minney is suspected to have been cooking meth in the home when the explosion occurred.

Nearby homes were evacuated and streets blocked off as HAZMAT crews were called in to clean up the residue and firefighters are investigating the exact cause of the explosion. Residents were let back into their homes later in the evening.

Jamestown Police Chief Roger Tyree told WKEF-TV news, “They discovered there are multiple propane tanks inside the residence, which we want to err on the side of caution.  It’s not a normal situation to find 4-5 propane tanks inside someone’s residence. It’s a very scary thing.  We know that he’s doing something in there improper.  Normally you don’t have propane tanks inside your home.”

According to authorities, police were not originally called to the home for an explosion. Family members from the home were taken to an area hospital with suspicious burns and police were notified by doctors. Upon arriving at the home, they discovered the aftermath of the explosion.

At last report Minney was in critical condition and a full investigation is ongoing.

Resources:

What is a meth lab?

What are the potential hazards of exposure to a meth lab?

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Saving our downtowns, one megamall at a time

In Business, Dayton Ohio News, Economy, history, Jobs, Local News, Opinion, Politics, Uncategorized on September 25, 2013 at 9:37 am

DIH LOGOLast week I covered a story for the local newspaper about a business that has been in downtown Xenia, Ohio for more than 70 years. To celebrate, the chamber of commerce held a ribbon cutting attended by the usual fare of friends, associates and dignitaries, all wanting either to sincerely congratulate the proprietors or mug their way into the photo op. Whatever their reasons for attending, it was refreshing to see people taking an interest in a small town’s revitalization.

Every day local governments offer tax breaks and other perks designed to attract new businesses to settle in their region, the obvious benefits to which are jobs and tax revenue. A good idea, of course, but while they’re building new strip malls on one end of town, the downtown sits empty and abandoned leaving the same government officials to puzzle over what to do with empty, decaying buildings.

So why not provide more incentive for businesses to locate in existing downtown areas before adding more sprawl? For those already there, encourage them to stay rather than making it easier for them to move into the latest strip mall.

Some communities sprang up from joined housing developments but for those like Xenia, Bellbrook, Jamestown and Fairborn, there is history, culture and charm still to be reclaimed. It’s truly puzzling why there is not more incentive to do what Xenia’s business owners are doing very well – revitalize and rejuvenate the downtown.

mall interiorMost confusing of all is the approval by local governments of sprawling mega-malls like The Greene, in Kettering, or is it Beavercreek? I’m not sure even they know where they are located. The brick walkways and old-fashioned street lights illuminating an array of sidewalk cafes and specialty shops were designed to look just like old downtown shopping squares that have long since been abandoned.

While they might add something to the local job market, these monster malls with their fake skylines, congested parking lots and Segway-riding rent-a-cops, do little to enhance the community. The sad thing is, eventually, the buildings go out of style and repulse new customers after a dozen years or so.

When Beavercreek’s Mall at Fairfield Commons first opened, it was all the rage; no more driving all the way out to Centerville or northwest Dayton to shop at an indoor mall. Today, there are huge unoccupied spaces in all of the indoor retail behemoths as businesses either shut down or move into newly-designed malls.

Believe it or not, “If you build it, they will come,” applies far more to retail sales than it ever did to a cornfield baseball diamond, so build it downtown. No matter where you put the temples of American gluttony and materialism people will find them and go to worship the almighty Abercrombie.

City governments should do more to help property owners attract major tenants to the old downtown areas, particularly big mall-style anchor stores. It would only take a couple of them to generate more interest from others and grow revenue for the property owners and the municipality.

Over the next month or so, small town politicians will be scrambling to win over your vote. Ask them the same questions posed here. If we really want to save our downtown areas, we have to start at the government level.

Instead of spending time and money worrying about ridiculous issues like whether a store’s sign is wood or plastic, how about making it easier and more attractive for businesses to locate in the downtown areas? It really is that easy.

A civic ambassador with a high-level business background in national retail sales could help to develop a plan of action and take it to companies like Macy’s and Abercrombie. Show them that it’s possible to create the genuine version of the fake atmosphere so popular at the outdoor malls. If it’s done properly, it would bring people downtown again to shop, eat and socialize.

Small business cannot support such efforts without a few major players in the ballgame. If there are to be more 70-year old businesses downtown, there needs to be a downtown for them to be in.

Xenia law firm celebrates more than 70 years downtown

In Business, Dayton Ohio News, Economy, history, Local News, News Media, Politics, Uncategorized on September 20, 2013 at 7:14 am

By Gery L. Deer

Editor

(Front Row From Left) Attorney Jeremiah Webb, Xenia Area Chamber of Commerce President Alan Liming, Attorney Alan Anderson, Xenia Mayor Marsha Bayless, Attorney David Phipps, Jim Saner (Montgomery Insurance) and Diane Davis.   Photo by Gery L. Deer

(Front Row From Left) Attorney Jeremiah Webb, Xenia Area Chamber of Commerce President Alan Liming, Attorney Alan Anderson, Xenia Mayor Marsha Bayless, Attorney David Phipps, Jim Saner (Montgomery Insurance) and Diane Davis. Photo by Gery L. Deer

XENIA, OH – When Robert Hirst Wead opened his law practice at the southwest corner of Main and Detroit Streets in Xenia’s Allen building, he probably had no idea it would still be serving Greene County more than 70 years later. On Wednesday, September 18 Wead, Anderson, Phipps and Aultman, LLC celebrated the milestone with a new sign, a ribbon cutting reception and a commitment to their part in the continuing rejuvenation of the city’s downtown.

About six years after Wead opened his original office, Philip Aultman joined him as a partner. Over the years, the firm was home for as many as six attorneys and the original partners have since passed away. Today, there are three lawyers working in the firm headed up by partners David Phipps and Alan Anderson. Phipps joined the team in 1991 and Anderson got his start with the practice back in 1979.

In addition to his private practice, Anderson is also currently serving on the Greene County Board of Commissioners. He believes that the current efforts toward the revitalization of Xenia one of the greatest benefits to those who live and work downtown.

“Xenia is so blessed to have a thriving, active downtown and the business owners and the city should be commended for all of their hard work towards continued improvement,” he says. “We’ve got nice restaurants, the new Harvest Moon Bakery, and there are some great businesses coming in downtown. We have a wonderful chamber of commerce with a lot of young people. When you get young people involved you know you have a future and they’re going to be building towards it.”

IMG_6316The third and latest addition to the team is attorney of counsel, Jeremiah B. Webb, who came on in February. A University of Dayton School of Law graduate, Webb was instrumental in the design and execution of the firm’s signage upgrade.

“I’m proud to be a part of Wead, Anderson, Phipps and Aultman,” Webb says. “Although our efforts may pale in comparison to other recent community improvements, we are yet another example, however small, of Xenia’s progress and movement toward a brighter future.”

Alan Anderson adds that there is plenty more to do. “We’re not done here yet,” he says, referring to the revitalization of Xenia and his own office building. “We’re going get some lighting on the sign and do some painting, possibly a mural on the side of the building.”

IMG_6312The ribbon cutting event was organized by the Xenia Area Chamber of Commerce and attended by local business associates. Wead, Anderson, Phipps and Aultman, LLC, is located at 53 W. Main Street. For more information go online to www.wapalawxenia.com or call (937) 372-4436.