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Posts Tagged ‘STEM schools’

Dayton 3D printer offers unique graduation remembrance

In Business, Children and Family, Dayton Ohio News, Local News, Technology, Uncategorized on May 11, 2015 at 3:03 pm

IMG_0912Dayton, OH – If a picture is worth a thousand words, then a three-dimensional likeness is probably priceless. Every year proud parents spend a fortune on photos of their graduating children, from both high school and college. But Brent Cox, marketing director of GetPrinting3D in Vandalia, wants you to know about a fun alternative – three-dimensional full color statues and bobble heads.

GetPrinting3D first opened its Dayton location in November 2014. The company specializes in full-service 3D printing resource including the sale of consumer 3D printers, scanners and software; 3D print services (like a 3D Kinkos); 3D design services; 3D printing related classes open to the public, human scanning and printing in full-color, 3D printing consultation, business-to-business product prototyping and engineering services.

Commemorative products such as bobble heads and statuettes can be created for just about any subject including graduation, athletes in uniform, special events, military recognition, weddings, pregnancy, retirement, and much more.

“We create a very special and high tech way to commemorate a memorable time in a person’s life, like graduation, with a GraduateTCTommy114tangible keepsake,” Cox said. “The product makes a unique and one-of-a-kind gift for those hard-to-get family members, grandparents, friends or business associates.”

The process of production is relatively easy, according to Cox. “The subject gets scanned at our N. Dixie Drive location at a pre-arranged appointment time and selects a product. We offer bobble heads, full-body statues, and more. The scan usually takes a total of 15 minutes and you pay for it at the time of order. It takes 2-3 weeks to complete and the customer can pick it up or have it shipped directly to them.

Cox noted one word of caution when considering whether a 3D product is right for you. “It is important that the person can to hold very still from 30 to 60 seconds while the scanning takes place, so young children can be a problem. We have successfully scanned a 5 and 6 year old but we can’t guarantee results on young children and pets simply do not work with our scanning process.”

DaytonStorePano_1_GetPrinting3D’s retail store is as much an educational experience for anyone studying the 3D printing technology and processes. “We desire to be a complete 3D printing resource for all levels of people and our more than 21 years years working with the technology gives us the experience and knowledge to do that,” Cox explained. “Our walk-in store provides a place where everyone from the local high school STEM teacher to GE’s engineering team members can visit, ask questions, learn about the technology and get great advice in a no-pressure space.”

As one way to help support technical education in the area, the company is also offering to donate a percentage of sales from their “3DYOU” products to qualifying schools that refer 3D printing customers. “Customers will just need to mention the school when they place their order,” Cox said, “we’d be thrilled if the money would be used to support the school’s STEM, or similar program.”

GetPrinting3D is located at 9375 N. Dixie Drive, Dayton, Ohio 45414, just north of the Miller Lane area. For more information or to schedule an appointment to have a 3D scan made, call 855-504-3833 or go online to www.getprinting3d.com.

 

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Language skills lacking in American education

In Children and Family, Economy, Education, National News, Opinion, Technology, Uncategorized on December 18, 2013 at 12:45 pm

DIH LOGOIn June of 2013 the Commission on the Humanities and Social Sciences released a report stating the United States is losing its long-time advantage in language and social sciences. Honestly, I didn’t need a federally mandated report to know that Americans are suffering from a chronic lack of language skills.

Every day I read business letters, websites, reports, technical documentation and a mountain of other material supposedly created by professionals but which exhibit the communication skills of a seventh-grader. Even basic sentence structure and punctuation seem to elude people today. Of course, it wasn’t always so.

Once upon a time, American education stressed the importance of what was somewhat inaccurately referred to as, the “three R’s” – reading, writing, and arithmetic. In those days, being able to read and write was considered paramount to a bright future and that’s never been truer than it is today. As information technology advances via the Internet and its collective user devices, one would expect people to actually become better communicators rather than the opposite.

Despite the low-tech, no-budget educational systems of the old days, it’s entirely possible Americans living a century ago may have been far better educated and communicative. Back then students of different grades spent the early school years together in a one-room schoolhouse having the basics repeatedly drilled into them. It might have been redundant by today’s standards, but people seemed to be better able to communicate.

WRITING R USRemote educational technologies coupled with strings of poorly strategized legislation have led to what I consider to be the isolation of the American student. Individualized study, Internet-based classrooms, severe budget reductions in schools and a constant decrease in human interaction have all contributed to the decline of language proficiency. Many states have even removed the teaching of cursive handwriting from the curriculum, a skill, in my opinion, that helps promote a more thoughtful, creative approach to the written language.

Today, however, humanities programs have continued to lose favor, not to mention funding, to high-tech and STEM schools. If you’re unfamiliar, STEM is an acronym for Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics, and refers to a school that specializes in those fields.

All well and good, particularly in today’s high-tech job market. But if these kids never learn to properly write a letter or give a verbal presentation, what’s the point? Having an engineering background myself I can personally attest to the fact that effective writing is vitally important in high-tech fields, yet communications courses are still not a priority for many schools.

Writers used to be highly respected, experienced professionals no matter what their area of expertise. Not anymore. Just ask anyone and you can bet he or she is a “writer,” making it harder for those more qualified who are trying to make a living. I don’t work cheaply, because I have two decades of experience writing for publishers and commercial clients and I am good at what I do.

Still, that seems to count for nothing when publishers are cash poor and I’m competing for work against the latest blogger cranking out poor quality content for free. Unfortunately, the ability for anyone and everyone to publish online has diminished the public’s intellectual expectations of quality content.

Qualified editors are likewise disappearing from the professional landscape. An increasing number of publishers are selling newspapers, magazines and books with scathing grammatical and technical errors making even the professionals appear amateur and sloppy.

It’s no wonder these skills are dying off even more rapidly than we might have anticipated even just five or six years ago. Increasingly, people are communicating not in words, but in a cyber-shorthand, through texting and instant messages. Words are abridged to their most needed letters making our written language read like a vanity license plate.

In order to remain competitive and relevant on the global stage, American education must enhance language and social science programs. If we put as much effort into reading and writing as we do into having the best football team, just imagine what our students could achieve.

 

Gery L. Deer is an independent columnist and co-founder of the Western Ohio Writers Association. More at http://www.gerydeer.com