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Horror author sets December tour in Greene County

In Books, Entertainment, Holiday, Local News, Print Media, Uncategorized on December 11, 2013 at 12:29 pm

howtosaveaworld-bookshot1GREENE COUNTY, OH – Beavercreek author Carl S. Plumer has been a writer since childhood, beginning with his own, single-issue newspaper. Now with the release of his second work of apocalyptic fiction, “How To Save A World From Dying: A Demon Apocalypse Love Story,” Plumer is visiting local bookstores in December to read, sign and talk about his journey from cub reporter to novelist.

Plumer will be visiting two Greene County bookstores beginning at 3:00 p.m. on Saturday December 7, with Dark Star Books, 247 Xenia Ave. in Yellow Springs. On December 14th, from 2-4:00 p.m., he will stop by Blue Jacket Books, 30 S. Detroit St. in Xenia. Each event will include a reading from the novels, question and answer time and of course an autograph session.

The second in his series of, “Apocalypse Love Stories,” his newest novel is a loose collection of stories with different characters, plots, and locations. All share the same mash-up of horror, comedy, and love. Plumer said he wanted to inject some humor in to his favorite genre and, with the first book, wrote the title first, setting the stage for a new collection of horror.

Author Carl S. Plumer

Author Carl S. Plumer

“I’m a fan of horror movies and books; I love getting scared,” Plumer said. “When I first started writing, all of my characters (spoiler alert) died at the end. I think because I couldn’t figure out how to end the story, not because I was trying to write horror.” Plumer noted that there really is an important message he wants to convey to his readers, even amid all of the blood, gore and humor.

“I put my characters into dire situations – apocalypses; as bad as things get. But they rise above extreme adversity with grace, dignity, and a sense of humor. The plot may be adventure with a bit of gross horror, but my message is, ‘Carry on, regardless.’ Chin up, chest out, you know? It’s the British side of my ancestry.”

“Plus, I thought death made my stories seem cool,” he noted. “Turns out horror mashed with humor is where I’m most at home.” His first book, “Mad About Undead You: A Zombie Apocalypse Love Story,” has been on shelves for about a year. His third is planned for July 2014. Plumer’s books are released by Someday Press.

Both of Plumer’s current titles will be available for purchase at the events. For more information on his appearances and a complete synopsis of both novels, visit the author’s website at www.carlplumer.com. Watch for Carl S. Plumer on the WDTN-TV2 daytime program, Living Dayton, at noon, Wednesday, December 4th.

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Author celebrates first anniversary of children’s book with reading November 2

In Books, Children and Family, Education, Entertainment, Literature, Local News, Print Media, sociology, Uncategorized on October 24, 2013 at 8:50 pm
Author Teasha Seitz, "Little Leah Lou and her Pink Tu"

Author Teasha Seitz, “Little Leah Lou and her Pink Tu”

XENIA, OH – Author Teasha Seitz is a Miami Valley native who has always enjoyed sharing and discovering stories with children. Her stories entertain, enlighten, and encourage young readers to explore their own world and discover who they are. Her first children’s book “Little Leah Lou and Her Pink Tu,” was released last year (ISBN 0985662506).

To help celebrate the book’s first anniversary, Blue Jacket Books in Xenia is hosting a reading and signing event beginning at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, November 2. The author will read from her book and the store will have free printed activities for children to do as well.

Illustrated by Jean Ditslear, “Little Leah Lou and Her Pink Tu” tells the story of Little Leah Lou, who loved to wear her pink tutu. She wore it everywhere she went and pretended to be a princess. But when she wore it to the zoo she encountered a giraffe with the munchies and Little Leah Lou was left with just half a tutu. Her tutu was ruined! Could this mean she’s no longer a princess? Little Leah Lou was shocked, but not for long. Her solution to the tutu tragedy will not only surprise and amuse readers; it will win her the admiration of one of the zoo’s flashiest residents.

In addition to copies of “Leah Lou” at a dollar off the cover price, children’s tutus will also be available for purchase as a “package” with the books. Blue Jacket Books is located at 30 S. Detroit St. in Xenia, Ohio. For more information call the store at (937) 376-3522 or go online to http://www.teashaseitz.com.

Little-Leah-Lou-and-Her-Pink-Tu-Seitz

Saving our downtowns, one megamall at a time

In Business, Dayton Ohio News, Economy, history, Jobs, Local News, Opinion, Politics, Uncategorized on September 25, 2013 at 9:37 am

DIH LOGOLast week I covered a story for the local newspaper about a business that has been in downtown Xenia, Ohio for more than 70 years. To celebrate, the chamber of commerce held a ribbon cutting attended by the usual fare of friends, associates and dignitaries, all wanting either to sincerely congratulate the proprietors or mug their way into the photo op. Whatever their reasons for attending, it was refreshing to see people taking an interest in a small town’s revitalization.

Every day local governments offer tax breaks and other perks designed to attract new businesses to settle in their region, the obvious benefits to which are jobs and tax revenue. A good idea, of course, but while they’re building new strip malls on one end of town, the downtown sits empty and abandoned leaving the same government officials to puzzle over what to do with empty, decaying buildings.

So why not provide more incentive for businesses to locate in existing downtown areas before adding more sprawl? For those already there, encourage them to stay rather than making it easier for them to move into the latest strip mall.

Some communities sprang up from joined housing developments but for those like Xenia, Bellbrook, Jamestown and Fairborn, there is history, culture and charm still to be reclaimed. It’s truly puzzling why there is not more incentive to do what Xenia’s business owners are doing very well – revitalize and rejuvenate the downtown.

mall interiorMost confusing of all is the approval by local governments of sprawling mega-malls like The Greene, in Kettering, or is it Beavercreek? I’m not sure even they know where they are located. The brick walkways and old-fashioned street lights illuminating an array of sidewalk cafes and specialty shops were designed to look just like old downtown shopping squares that have long since been abandoned.

While they might add something to the local job market, these monster malls with their fake skylines, congested parking lots and Segway-riding rent-a-cops, do little to enhance the community. The sad thing is, eventually, the buildings go out of style and repulse new customers after a dozen years or so.

When Beavercreek’s Mall at Fairfield Commons first opened, it was all the rage; no more driving all the way out to Centerville or northwest Dayton to shop at an indoor mall. Today, there are huge unoccupied spaces in all of the indoor retail behemoths as businesses either shut down or move into newly-designed malls.

Believe it or not, “If you build it, they will come,” applies far more to retail sales than it ever did to a cornfield baseball diamond, so build it downtown. No matter where you put the temples of American gluttony and materialism people will find them and go to worship the almighty Abercrombie.

City governments should do more to help property owners attract major tenants to the old downtown areas, particularly big mall-style anchor stores. It would only take a couple of them to generate more interest from others and grow revenue for the property owners and the municipality.

Over the next month or so, small town politicians will be scrambling to win over your vote. Ask them the same questions posed here. If we really want to save our downtown areas, we have to start at the government level.

Instead of spending time and money worrying about ridiculous issues like whether a store’s sign is wood or plastic, how about making it easier and more attractive for businesses to locate in the downtown areas? It really is that easy.

A civic ambassador with a high-level business background in national retail sales could help to develop a plan of action and take it to companies like Macy’s and Abercrombie. Show them that it’s possible to create the genuine version of the fake atmosphere so popular at the outdoor malls. If it’s done properly, it would bring people downtown again to shop, eat and socialize.

Small business cannot support such efforts without a few major players in the ballgame. If there are to be more 70-year old businesses downtown, there needs to be a downtown for them to be in.

Xenia law firm celebrates more than 70 years downtown

In Business, Dayton Ohio News, Economy, history, Local News, News Media, Politics, Uncategorized on September 20, 2013 at 7:14 am

By Gery L. Deer

Editor

(Front Row From Left) Attorney Jeremiah Webb, Xenia Area Chamber of Commerce President Alan Liming, Attorney Alan Anderson, Xenia Mayor Marsha Bayless, Attorney David Phipps, Jim Saner (Montgomery Insurance) and Diane Davis.   Photo by Gery L. Deer

(Front Row From Left) Attorney Jeremiah Webb, Xenia Area Chamber of Commerce President Alan Liming, Attorney Alan Anderson, Xenia Mayor Marsha Bayless, Attorney David Phipps, Jim Saner (Montgomery Insurance) and Diane Davis. Photo by Gery L. Deer

XENIA, OH – When Robert Hirst Wead opened his law practice at the southwest corner of Main and Detroit Streets in Xenia’s Allen building, he probably had no idea it would still be serving Greene County more than 70 years later. On Wednesday, September 18 Wead, Anderson, Phipps and Aultman, LLC celebrated the milestone with a new sign, a ribbon cutting reception and a commitment to their part in the continuing rejuvenation of the city’s downtown.

About six years after Wead opened his original office, Philip Aultman joined him as a partner. Over the years, the firm was home for as many as six attorneys and the original partners have since passed away. Today, there are three lawyers working in the firm headed up by partners David Phipps and Alan Anderson. Phipps joined the team in 1991 and Anderson got his start with the practice back in 1979.

In addition to his private practice, Anderson is also currently serving on the Greene County Board of Commissioners. He believes that the current efforts toward the revitalization of Xenia one of the greatest benefits to those who live and work downtown.

“Xenia is so blessed to have a thriving, active downtown and the business owners and the city should be commended for all of their hard work towards continued improvement,” he says. “We’ve got nice restaurants, the new Harvest Moon Bakery, and there are some great businesses coming in downtown. We have a wonderful chamber of commerce with a lot of young people. When you get young people involved you know you have a future and they’re going to be building towards it.”

IMG_6316The third and latest addition to the team is attorney of counsel, Jeremiah B. Webb, who came on in February. A University of Dayton School of Law graduate, Webb was instrumental in the design and execution of the firm’s signage upgrade.

“I’m proud to be a part of Wead, Anderson, Phipps and Aultman,” Webb says. “Although our efforts may pale in comparison to other recent community improvements, we are yet another example, however small, of Xenia’s progress and movement toward a brighter future.”

Alan Anderson adds that there is plenty more to do. “We’re not done here yet,” he says, referring to the revitalization of Xenia and his own office building. “We’re going get some lighting on the sign and do some painting, possibly a mural on the side of the building.”

IMG_6312The ribbon cutting event was organized by the Xenia Area Chamber of Commerce and attended by local business associates. Wead, Anderson, Phipps and Aultman, LLC, is located at 53 W. Main Street. For more information go online to www.wapalawxenia.com or call (937) 372-4436.

GCCHD offers back-to-school physicals and immunizations

In Children and Family, Education, Health, Local News on August 20, 2013 at 2:06 pm

imageXENIA, OH – The Greene County Combined Health District (GCCHD) is reminding parents and students that GCCHD offers Back-to-School physicals, sports physicals and immunizations. In the coming weeks, the District is also offering expanded hours for immunizations, including one clinic specifically designed for children entering Kindergarten and 7th grade.
For Back-to-School and sports physicals, an appointment is needed. The Child and Adolescent Health clinic is held on Mondays at the GCCHD main office, 360 Wilson Dr., Xenia, OH. The number to call for appointments and information is (937) 374-5655.

For Immunizations, walk-in clinics are held:

• Every Tuesday at GCCHD from 8:00 – 11:00 a.m. and 12:30 – 3:00 p.m.
• The 2nd and 4th Thursday of the month at GCCHD from 4:00 – 6:00 p.m.

A special clinic will be held on Thursday, August 29 at the main office of GCCHD from 2:30 – 6:00p.m. for students from any school district in Greene County entering Kindergarten and 7th grade ONLY. Parents are asked to bring the child’s shot record to the clinic. These immunizations meet school requirements.
Additional School District clinic dates and times are as follows:

• Tuesday, September 3: Bellbrook-Sugarcreek Schools, Cedar Cliff & Yellow Springs Schools
o 8:00 – 11:00 a.m.
o 12:30 – 3:00 p.m.
o 4:00 – 6:00 p.m.

• Tuesday, September 10: Fairborn City Schools
o 8:00 – 11:00 a.m.
o 12:30 – 3:00 p.m.
o 4:00 – 6:00 p.m.

Tuesday, September 17: Beavercreek City Schools

o 8:00 – 11:00 a.m.
o 12:30 – 3:00 p.m.
o 4:00 – 6:00 p.m.
• Tuesday, September 24: Xenia Community Schools
o 8:00 – 11:00 a.m.
o 12:30 – 3:00 p.m.
o 4:00 – 6:00 p.m.
• Thursday, September 26: Greeneview Local Schools
o 2:30 – 6:00 p.m.
For all immunizations, please bring all shot records. GCCHD accepts uninsured patients, and will bill Anthem, Medical Mutual, and various types of Medicaid, including CareSource and Molina. For these insurances, clients must present a current insurance card and parent or guardian’s photo ID in order to receive service.

Clients are responsible to pay any balance which is not covered by your insurance. There is a charge for immunization services and full or partial payment is required at time of service. For all other private insurances, you will be asked to pay GCCHD for services provided. We will provide you with a receipt to submit to your insurance company, if requested. Unfortunately, GCCHD is unable to accept credit card payments.
For more information, please call the Immunization Hotline at (937) 374-5657 or the immunization clerk at (937) 374-5668.

Rise in Near-Drowning Incidents Remind Ohioans of the Need for Water Safety

In Children and Family, Education, Health, Local News, World News on July 1, 2013 at 11:33 am
Prevent near drowning injuries with proper safety. (Photo courtesy Ohio.com)

Prevent near drowning injuries with proper safety. (Photo courtesy Ohio.com)

XENIA, OH—A recent analysis of the number of children treated in emergency departments for near drowning incidents has officials at the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) and the Greene County Combined Health District emphasizing the need for safe water practices.

ODH tracks near-drowning incidents, which are reported to the state agency by emergency department personnel on a daily basis. The emergency department data show a clear seasonal trend in near drowning incidents from the months of May-August. Children and youth are at an increased risk for drowning during these summer months. Parents should  closely monitor their children’s play during water activities.

ODH also monitors death certificates to ascertain the number of drowning deaths. In 2012 in Ohio, 29 children and 69 adults died from drowning, according to preliminary ODH death certificate data. According to the Greene County Coroner’s office, there have been only 2 drowning deaths in Greene County in the last 5 years, one in 2008 and one in 2009.

While children can drown in water anywhere, young children (aged 1 to 9) are at greater risk of
drowning in swimming pools while older youth (aged 10 to 19) are at greater risk of drowning in
natural bodies of water and is the second leading cause of death in children aged 0-4 according to the CDC.

“Swimming and water-related activities are a great way to stay fit. There are risks, however, such as water-related illness, sunburn and the risk of drowning,” says Melissa Howell, Health Commissioner for the Greene County Combined Health District.

Here are some important water safety tips:

Fence it off. Install a four–sided isolation fence, with self–closing and self–latching gates, around backyard swimming pools. This can help keep children away from the area when a parent cannot supervise them. Pool fences should  completely separate the house and play area from the pool. If children can gain access to pools through the house or poorly-latched gates, they are at risk of drowning. Door alarms, pool alarms and automatic pool covers can add an extra layer of protection when used properly, but should not replace a fence and good supervision.

Never swim alone. Always have a buddy with you when you swim. It is also good to have a watch buddy as well in the event someone needs to contact emergency personnel.

Be on the lookout. Supervise young children at all times around bathtubs, swimming pools, ponds, lakes, and other bodies of water. Partner with other parents to take turns watching children at swimming pools. While parents often believe they will hear splashing or shouting, drowning is often silent and occurs quickly.

Begin teaching children to swim early. Experts suggest starting swimming lessons after age 4. Local YMCAs offer swimming lessons for children as young as 6 months (with a parent) to adults. Also, please note that water safety programs for infants and young children are not a substitute for good supervision.

Make life jackets a “must.” Make sure all kids wear life jackets (also known as personal flotation devices or PFDs) in and around natural bodies of water, such as lakes, rivers and ponds, even if they know how to swim. Ohio law requires children under the age of 10 to wear a PFD at all times on boats under 18 feet long, however older children will be safest when they wear PFDs too.

The PFD must be:

• U.S. Coast Guard approved Type I, II, III, or V
• In good and serviceable condition
• Of appropriate size
• Securely attached.

Learn CPR. Learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and get re-certified every two years. Immediate CPR can help a child stay alive and reduce the chance of brain damage.

Install drain covers and safety releases. To avoid drain entanglement and entrapment in pools and spas, install anti-entrapment drain covers and safety vacuum release systems.
For more information on water safety and other safe and healthy summer practices, please visit: www.odh.ohio.gov. For more information about the Greene County Combined Health District, please visit www.gcchd.org.

Greene County Healthy Lifestyles Coalition To Hold 10th Annual Family Fitness Challenge

In Children and Family, Education, Health, Local News, Senior Lifestyle, Uncategorized on June 13, 2013 at 10:11 am

Xenia, OH – The Greene County Healthy Lifestyles Coalition is hosting its 10th Annual Family Fitness
Challenge on Thursday, June 20th at Shawnee Park in Xenia from 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. The event is FREE and
open to the public. Families and groups are encouraged to attend.

The Fitness Challenge is designed to motivate youth and families to adopt healthier lifestyles—specifically in
the areas of fitness and nutrition. Participants can visit fitness stations and health information booths, complete
a fitness passport and receive a free prize (while supplies last). Healthy snacks will be available.

Partners for the Challenge include the Greene County Combined Health District, the Greene County Healthy
Lifestyles Coalition, Women’s Recovery Center, TCN Behavioral Health Services, Community Action
Partnership, Greene County Parks & Trails, the Greene County Public Library, ZumbAtomic and Fairborn
Kids’ Learning Place. For more information, call Laurie Fox at 937-374-5669.

Science and the public benefit from storm chasers

In Education, Local News, Media, National News, Opinion, Science, Technology, Uncategorized on June 3, 2013 at 10:52 pm

Deer In Headlines

By Gery L. Deer

WHIO-TV's weather radar as it appeared on April 3, 1974 approximately 4:20PM as the Xenia Tornado touched down. Notice the "hook" echo indicating the twister.

WHIO-TV’s weather radar as it appeared on April 3, 1974 approximately 4:20PM as the Xenia Tornado touched down. Notice the “hook” echo indicating the twister.

In the 48 hour period between April 3rd and 4th, 1974, the Midwestern United States experienced one of the most devastating tornado outbreaks in history. Known as a “super outbreak,” 148 confirmed tornadoes touched down from Michigan to Alabama and Illinois to West Virginia, with 30 of them in the F4-F5 categories and resulting in the deaths of 300.

One of the most devastated towns was Xenia, Ohio, where a massive F5 funnel tore through the city leaving a mile-wide path of destruction, killing 33 and injuring more than 1,100. The low death toll is attributed to advanced warning provided by WHIO-TV weatherman, Gil Whitney using the first local weather radar system in the Dayton area.

Satellite, GPS and advanced warning networks, along with modern Doppler radar have all helped increase early warnings for tornado victims from less than 3 minutes to more than 15 minutes. Much advancement in severe weather detection might never have happened, however, without the work of the brave men and women who call themselves, storm chasers.

Storm chasers are serious scientists working to increase our knowledge of tornadoes and how they behave. Unlike those depicted in the 1996 movie, “Twister,” however, chasers experience little glory instead spending days and weeks in preparation that may result only in a few moments of tornado spotting.

As you might expect, purposely trying to outmaneuver the proverbial “finger of God” carries with it some inherent danger. Unfortunately, that danger can turn deadly at any moment.

On May 31st, revered storm chaser Tim Samaras, 55; his son, Paul, 24; and meteorologist Carl Young, 45, were killed near El Reno, Oklahoma as they tried to document one of several tornadoes moving through the area. Since their deaths, many have asked, “Is the data gathered from storm chasing worth the risk?” In my opinion, yes, it is.

I’ve always been fascinated by tornadoes. The day after the Xenia tornado of ’74, my parents took me along as they assisted with the cleanup efforts by using our grain trucks to help haul away debris. I never forgot what I saw there. Nor will I ever forget the darkened, green sky and the strange, coldness of the air as the monster storm was passing through. It marked my psyche for years to come.

Possibly the most famous photo of the Xenia Ohio 1974 Tornado. Taken from Greene Memorial Hospital by Fred Stewart.

Possibly the most famous photo of the Xenia Ohio 1974 Tornado. Taken from Greene Memorial Hospital by Fred Stewart.

The experience left me nearly terrified of storms, until one day in 1988, when I was alone at our family farm and stepped outside after hearing tree branches break during a storm. I stood on our front porch, paralyzed, as I watched a small funnel cloud worm its way across the pasture in front of me, parallel to our house.

My ears popped as I stood motionless, surrounded by completely still air except for the slim tube descending from the sky into a swirling mass of dust. With almost no sound at all, it smashed the wooden sideboards of one of our old trucks, crossed the field about a half mile away and totally demolished a neighbor’s barn.

As quickly as it came, it was gone. That day, my fear gave way to a new respect for one of nature’s most dangerous, ephemeral phenomena. Since then, I’ve been within eye-shot of two more tornadoes and educated myself about them as best I could without taking to the road as a chaser.

But, I have the utmost respect – not to mention appreciation – for those who have. While there are probably some storm chasers who are just thrill-seekers, I have no doubt that most are in it for the science and the potential benefit that comes from the effort.

Early warning systems now broadcast through TV, Internet and cell phones, and most air raid sirens have been re-purposed for use as tornado warning systems. Everyone in and around Tornado Alley should remain diligent when severe weather approaches and heed warnings when they are issued.

It’s doubtful we’ll ever be able to fully predict when and where a tornado will strike but, thanks to the work done by storm chasers, scientists can give people a fighting chance to be better prepared.

 

Gery L. Deer is an independent columnist and business writer based in Jamestown, Ohio. More at http://www.gerydeer.com.

Author Shares Journey of Love and Despair as Caregiver for a Mother Ravaged Dementia

In Books, Education, Entertainment, Health, psychology, Senior Lifestyle, sociology, Uncategorized on May 30, 2013 at 1:43 pm

Elaine Pereira yearbookGREENE COUNTY, OH –  Author Elaine Pereira shared the seemingly never-ending journey of caring for her mother stricken with dementia in her newly-released book I Will Never Forget: A Daughter’s Story of Her Mother’s Arduous and Humorous Journey through Dementia (ISBN 978-1-4759-0690-5). The award-winning author will be visiting Xenia for two public events, June 6 and 7.

I Will Never Forget is a powerful true story of the author’s talented mother, Betty, and her poignant and humorous journey through dementia. As their mother-daughter relationship evolves, Elaine copes with her mom’s uncharacteristic verbal assaults and watches as her brilliant mind is slowly destroyed by dementia’s insatiable appetite for brain cells.

Elaine Pereira earned a BS in Occupational Therapy and an MA in Family and Consumer Resources from Wayne State University and worked as a school occupational therapist for more than 35 years before retiring in June 2010. In this moving account, Pereira shares warm and humorous incidents as well as tragic and overwhelming encounters from the death of her father, sister-in-law, brother and her mother’s journey through a new world after her familiar world fades from her memory.

“This is a true story which validates the incredible events that happened in my mother’s life,” says Pereira. “From writing nine checks to the same payee, on five consecutive days, and later on the Great Houdini Escape when she nearly froze to death, Mom’s journey through bewildering dementia is real.

Cover I Will Never Forget 1-15-13I Will Never Forget is educational and therapeutic but is a journal full of insights that will provide helpful assistance and tips to other caregivers of dementia patients. “I want newly-commissioned caregivers to learn from my unwitting mistakes, to realize that reasoning and logic are rarely helpful dialogue techniques with a dementia patient,” explains the author.

“That approach is confrontational and often creates agitation and a fear response in someone. Redirection, re-phrasing, waiting and patience are the most helpful response strategies to diffuse potentially hostile situations.”

During the year long writing process, Pereira was able to put the troubling incidents in her mother’s final years in perspective. “The little problems faded away and the core of her wonderful life surfaced for me. That is how I want to remember her, as she was in my eyes as a child.”

Pereira’s book was named a finalist in the Best New Non-Fiction category of the 2012 USA Book Award and was an honorable mention finalist in non-fiction in the 2012 Hollywood Book Festival and was bestowed a ‘Rising Star’ and ‘Editor’s Choice award by iUniverse. The book most recently won the aging category in the 2013 National Indie Excellence Awards.

At 7PM, Thursday June 6, Pereira will speak to the members of the Western Ohio Writers Association at  Blue Jacket Books, 30 S. Detroit St. in Xenia, Ohio, with an emphasis on how and why she wrote the memoir about her experience. The event is $5 per person, open to the public, and RSVP is requested by emailing the organization’s director, Gery L. Deer, wowainprint@gmail.com

The next evening, Friday June 7, beginning at 7PM, the author will be at Blue Jacket Books, 30 S. Detroit St. in Xenia, Ohio, to speak about the experiences so many people now have in caring for a parent or other loved one suffering the ravages of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. There is no charge for this event and seating is first come first served. For information call 937-376-3522. The author will be selling and signing books at both events.

Eleven local authors featured in new book launching May 3 at Blue Jacket Books

In Books, Business, Entertainment, Local News, Senior Lifestyle, Uncategorized on April 20, 2013 at 9:02 am
"Flights of Fancy" is an anthology of stories set in southwest Ohio by local authors from the Western Ohio Writers Association. It will hit shelves in mid-April 2013 and features local talent and production.

“Flights of Fancy” is an anthology of stories set in southwest Ohio by local authors from the Western Ohio Writers Association. It will hit shelves in mid-April 2013 and features local talent and production.

Xenia, OH –The Western Ohio Writers Association (WOWA) invites the public to attend the official launch event for their first book, Flights of Fiction, an anthology of short stories set in and around southwest Ohio, published by Loconeal Publishing / Handcar Press.

Officially released on April 15, the book and its authors will be presented publicly at 7PM on Friday, May 3rd, at Blue Jacket Books, 30 S. Detroit St. in Xenia with a 2-hour reception and signing. The event is free of charge and open to the public. It will begin with an introduction to the authors and a reading of parts of the book by the authors, followed by a signing and reception.

The WOWA was founded in 2008 by Gery and Barbara Deer, of Jamestown, in an effort to provide local writers with peer critique, educational and networking opportunities previously unavailable except at tremendous expense. Gery is a full-time business writer and author of the syndicated, weekly op-ed column, “Deer in Headlines.”

Flights of Fiction is a group effort by just a few of the most talented authors in our organization and in the southwest Ohio region,” explains Gery L. Deer, co-founder of the WOWA and executive editor of the anthology.

“These soon-to-be classic tales let you follow one man’s tragic story at the end of the world in “Dead of Winter”; experience a night at the National Museum of the United States Air Force in “Nose Art”; and get lost in a haunting image from the past in “Tabitha’s Portrait,” plus many more. From detective tales to a trek into the mysterious world of wrestling, Flights of Fiction has something for everyone.”

He adds that Blue Jacket is a kind of second home to the WOWA. “We’re honored that Blue Jacket Books is hosting our book launch. We have had several signing and public reading events at the store and it’s great to see it growing and doing well.”

A limited number of copies of Flights of Fiction will be on hand for sale at the event with a cover price of $11.95. The paperback is available now with an electronic version set for release in mid-May. Find further information about the Western Ohio Writers Association or order Flight of Fiction online at http://www.westernohiowriters.org.