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Dayton-based 3D manufacturing leader Bastech, Inc., combines brands

In Business, Dayton Ohio News, Economy, Media, News Media, Science, Technology, Uncategorized on September 27, 2015 at 2:53 pm


Ben Staub, Jr., owner and president of Bastech, Inc.

Dayton, OH – Dayton-based Bastech, Inc., has combined its full range of manufacturing and consumer services under one brand. Since its founding two decades ago, Bastech, Inc., has grown into three separate divisions offering a wide range of services and products from manufacturing prototypes and end-use parts to professional and consumer 3D printing equipment solutions.

Bastech, Inc., is an industry leader in field of “additive manufacturing,” or what is now more commonly known as 3D printing. The company opened in 1994 and first applied the process to automotive and product design.

Today Bastech, Inc., develops revolutionary solutions for many applications including aerospace, medical device, jewelry, packaging, metal casting, injection molding, education and more. As more commercial opportunities arose the firm established separate companies to manage industry-changing niche services.

The first, Rapid Direction, Inc., was founded in 2006 to provide 3D printing equipment and supplies, meeting the needs of those manufacturers who wanted to have in-house, 3D part production capability. Next, the retail 3D printing service, GetPrinting3D, was established in 2012 and offers consumer-based products, ranging from desktop 3D printers to full-color, 3D figurines and custom bobble heads.

Bastech’s president and owner, Ben Staub, Jr., first worked with additive manufacturing during the early 1990s. During that time, he learned the complexities of programming and prototyping with stereolithography (SLA), one of several methods used to create 3D printed objects.

That experience, combined with his background from a strong manufacturing-based, entrepreneurial family culture gave him the tools to master the process and, more importantly, match advancing capabilities with industry demand.

As the technology becomes more accessible and the industry more fluid, Staub recognized that the division of these related products and services into separate entities might make for missed opportunities.

“Many times, customers of one company have no idea what the other has to offer,” Staub says. “Explaining why we have different business units has often been confusing, even to our own people.”

For example, an electronics manufacturer outsourcing prototype parts to Bastech might not be aware that Rapid Direction could actually provide an in-house solution.

More applications for 3D printing are being developed every day and Staub’s team wants Bastech to grow with the demand while giving customers the single, best resource. Over the next few months, a concentrated brand identity will be rolled out to present a clear, single solution under the name Bastech.

“Rebranding is never an easy decision, or an uncomplicated one to execute,” he said. “Nevertheless, it is the right time for that to take place and ‘Bastech’ will become the one solution for our customers.”

Bastech, Inc., corporate facility is located at 9233 N. Dixie Dr. in Dayton. For more information, contact Bastech, Inc., by calling the corporate offices at 855-890-9292 or go online to http://www.bastech.com.

Prevent Blindness declares September as Sports Eye Safety Awareness Month

In Children and Family, Dayton Ohio News, Health, Sports News, Uncategorized on September 14, 2015 at 10:11 am

Dayton, OH – Prevent Blindness has declared September as Sports Eye Safety Awareness Month to encourage athletes to wear proper eye protection while playing sports. According to estimates by Prevent Blindness, the top five sports resulting in the most eye injuries were basketball, water and pool activities, use of air, gas, spring or BB guns, baseball/softball and football. In fact, in a single year, more than 6,000 Americans suffered an eye injury related to playing basketball.

Founded in 1908, Prevent Blindness is America’s leading volunteer eye health and safety organization dedicated to fighting blindness and saving sight. Serving the entire state, the Ohio Affiliate of Prevent Blindness provides direct services to more than 800,000 Ohioans annually and educates millions of consumers about how to protect and preserve the precious gift of sight.

The National Eye Institute reports that a sports-related eye injury is admitted to a U.S. emergency room every 13 minutes. Eye injuries from sports may include infection, corneal abrasions, blunt trauma, inflamed iris, fracture of the eye socket, swollen or detached retinas or a traumatic cataract. In the worst cases, some injuries may result in permanent vision loss. However, this kind of eye injury is 90-percent preventable.

sports googleKatie Neubert is the Dayton Area Manager for Prevent Blindness. “An injury can happen in a split second, but the effects of a series eye injury can have lasting negative effects for a lifetime,” she says. “That’s why Prevent Blindness encourages all athletes to always make sure that appropriate, properly fitting protective eye gear is part of their uniform.”

Parents, coaches, school staff and others can support children’s sports eye safety by following these tips.

Learn About The Risks – Parents, teachers, school nurses and coaches should learn about eye injury risks associated with sports before allowing children to participate. Enroll your child only in adult-supervised sporting activities through a school district, community center, etc., and try to discourage participation in high-risk sports, such as boxing, since adequate eye protection does not yet exist.

Always Use Protective Eyewear – Most sports-related eye injuries are preventable. Whatever the sport or the athlete’s age, appropriate protective eyewear is the first, best defense against eye injury. Also, be sure the child is seeing clearly by getting him or her an eye exam and request recommendations for protective eyewear before enrolling in any sports program.

Learn Warning Signs of Injury – Parents, teachers, school nurses and coaches should familiarize themselves with the warning signs of a serious eye injury and know when to seek treatment. Parents should also make it a point to meet with coaches or athletic trainers to ensure the proper procedures are in place to deal with a child’s eye injury should one occur.

To further support these efforts, Prevent Blindness is teaming up with Liberty Sport to provide eye care professionals with free information and materials through the “September is Sports Eye Injury Prevention Awareness Month” campaign. For more information please call Prevent Blindness locally at 937-223-8766 or visit preventblindness.org/sports-eye-safety.

Struggling to care for seniors at home

In Children and Family, Health, National News, Opinion, Senior Lifestyle, Uncategorized on September 14, 2015 at 9:33 am

Deer In Headlines

By Gery L. Deer

DIH LOGOA recent article in The Atlantic discussed the question of the difficulty of finding adequate care for America’s senior citizens as more of them are choosing to remain in their own homes as they age. In the article, published April 27, 2015 by Alana Samuels, the author relates the story of her grandmother’s plight to find adequate, affordable home care near the college town of Amherst, Massachusetts.

A shortage of qualified Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) coupled with outrageous hourly fees made the task of caring for her Parkinson’s ridden spouse that much more difficult. The author’s grandmother eventually gave up on agencies and a friend helped out until her husband’s death a couple of years later. It’s a story becoming all too common today.

By the year 2030, more than one quarter of all Americans will be over the age of 65. More than ever, those people are choosing to remain in their homes as long as possible, relying on home health care and the assistance of family for everything from grocery shopping to bathing.

Screen Shot 2015-09-14 at 9.31.25 AMOver the last few years, a host of “non-medical” in-home care agencies have sprung up all around the country, spread by franchise. Most offer no skilled health care services and little more than baby-sitting. They can help with things like shopping, cleaning and some companionship for homebound seniors.

But, these home care workers are not permitted to help in medical matters, not even to distribute medications, as would a CNA or other state-registered, skilled health care worker. One published estimate by Genworth puts the cost of non-medical home at a range of $10 to $36 per hour. The extreme discrepancy is attributed to variations in region and the type of care required.

One question families should be asking is exactly what could an unskilled worker possibly do that’s worth $36 per hour? Still, most have few options available; it’s either a nursing facility or home care.

Plus, the home itself can be more hazardous than the disabilities suffered by the senior. It may be necessary to modify the home to accommodate “aging in place,” with zero-clearance shower stalls, raised toilets, grab bars, and much more. This also carries added expense and attention to which families might be unaware.

The fact is that it’s much better, psychologically, and far cheaper for seniors to remain in their own home. But most people caring for an elderly family member cannot be with them all hours – people have to work and care for their own homes and families – and still need outside support.

The first place to start is with the local agencies on aging. Most counties or regions have a non-profit organization such as this to help put families and seniors in touch with needed services such as meals on wheels, in-home healthcare, and more.

Be aware, however, that most services referred by these agencies are self-pay and are not covered by Medicare or insurance. The advantage, however, is that they can generally offer a discounted rate on certain services based on the income of the senior. Contact the local agency for details.

For support on in-home modifications, consult the local builders association for referrals to certified aging in place specialists. Most can provide design and construction information for everything from a simple grab bar installation to more complex additions such as elevators.

Additionally, financial and insurance companies out there might be missing the boat on a potentially golden profit center – “in-home care insurance.” Separate from long-term care or other types of health insurance, this could be a specific product that addresses the far less-expensive options of keeping a senior at home rather than in a skilled care facility. Give it a slightly lower premium and the ability to purchase later in life, and it would likely be less difficult to sell.

Before hiring anyone, caregivers should do their homework. Get at least three references from previous clients and do a thorough Google search on the agency you choose.

Whatever the overall solutions to the home health care problem, it’s clear something has to be done in a hurry. With incidents of elder abuse on the rise in nursing facilities, it’s imperative that families have alternate care options.

Gery L. Deer is an independent columnist and business writer. Deer In Headlines is distributed by GLD Enterprises Communications. More at gerydeer.com.


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